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Clinical features of multiple sclerosis in adults

Author
Michael J Olek, DO
Section Editor
Francisco Gonzalez-Scarano, MD
Deputy Editor
John F Dashe, MD, PhD

INTRODUCTION

Diseases that affect central nervous system myelin can be categorized as demyelinating (acquired, inflammatory) and dysmyelinating (abnormal formation of myelin, usually genetic basis) (table 1). The most common immune-mediated inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system is multiple sclerosis (MS).

The clinical features and disease course of MS will be reviewed here. Other aspects of MS are discussed separately:

(See "Pathogenesis and epidemiology of multiple sclerosis".)

(See "Clinical course and classification of multiple sclerosis".)

(See "Clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of multiple sclerosis".)

                      

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Literature review current through: May 2015. | This topic last updated: Jun 28, 2015.
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