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Medline ® Abstracts for References 93,94

of 'Chronic functional constipation and fecal incontinence in infants and children: Treatment'

93
TI
Cow's-milk-free diet as a therapeutic option in childhood chronic constipation.
AU
Irastorza I, Ibañez B, Delgado-Sanzonetti L, Maruri N, Vitoria JC
SO
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2010;51(2):171.
 
OBJECTIVES: It has been reported that a number of children with constipation respond to a diet free of cow's-milk (CM) proteins, although evidence is lacking to support an immunoglobulin E-mediated mechanism.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed an open-label crossover study comparing CM and rice milk in 69 children who fulfilled Rome III criteria for chronic constipation. Clinical, physical, and immunologic parameters of patients who responded (R) and who did not respond (NR) to a CM-free diet were compared.
RESULTS: Thirty-five of the 69 children (51%) improved during the first CM-free diet phase, 8 of these did not develop constipation when CM was reintroduced, and 27 children (39%) developed constipation during the CM challenge and improved during the second CM-free diet phase (R group). Thirty-four children (49%) did not improve during the first CM-free diet phase (NR group). Bowel movements per week among R children significantly increased compared with NR children (R: 2.8-7.7 vs NR: 2.6-2.7) (P<0.001). Seventy-eight percent of the children with developmental delay responded to the CM-free diet (P = 0.007). No significant statistical difference was found between the R and NR children in terms of fiber and milk consumption; atopic or allergic history; full-blood eosinophil count and percentage, and lymphocyte populations; immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin (Ig)G subclasses, total IgE; and serum-specific immunoglobulin E for CM proteins.
CONCLUSIONS: A clear association between CM consumption and constipation has been found in more than one third of children. However, analytical parameters do not demonstrate an immunoglobulin E-mediated immunologic mechanism.
AD
Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Hospital de Cruces, Bilbao, Spain. iirastorza@osakidetza.net
PMID
94
TI
Cow's milk protein intolerance and chronic constipation in children.
AU
Daher S, Tahan S, SoléD, Naspitz CK, Da Silva Patrício FR, Neto UF, De Morais MB
SO
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2001;12(6):339.
 
Cow's milk protein (CMP) allergy was investigated in 25 children (age-range 3 months to 11 years) with chronic constipation. A diagnosis of constipation was made on the basis of a history of painful elimination of hard stools for at least 1 month, whether or not associated with a reduced frequency of stools or soiling. The children were evaluated using clinical parameters and the following laboratory tests: total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE); specific IgE (radioallergosorbent test [RAST]) for whole cow's milk, alpha-lactoalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, and a food group; and skin-prick tests with whole milk, alpha-lactoalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, and casein. Following the evaluation, the children were submitted to a CMP-free diet for a period of 4 weeks. In seven patients (28%), constipation disappeared during the CMP-free diet and reappeared within 48-72 h following challenge with cow's milk. In two infants a rectal biopsy revealed allergic colitis and they therefore did not undergo the challenge. High serum levels of total IgE were observed in five of the children who showed a clinical improvement (71%), a positive skin-test in two (29%), and detectable specific IgE in two (29%). These results suggest that CMP allergy or intolerance should be considered as a cause of chronic refractory constipation in children, although the underlying mechanism still require further investigation.
AD
Divisions of Allergy, Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, UNIFESP - EPM, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. silviadaher@hotmail.com
PMID