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Medline ® Abstracts for References 4,62

of 'Chronic functional constipation and fecal incontinence in infants and children: Treatment'

4
TI
Polyethylene glycol 3350 without electrolytes for the treatment of functional constipation in infants and toddlers.
AU
Loening-Baucke V, Krishna R, Pashankar DS
SO
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2004;39(5):536.
 
OBJECTIVES: We have recently reported the safety and efficacy of polyethylene glycol 3350 without electrolytes (PEG) for the daily treatment of constipation in older children. Because there are very few data available on the use of PEG in infants and toddlers, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of PEG for the treatment of constipation in children<2 years of age.
METHODS: This is a retrospective chart review of 75 constipated children<2 years of age at start of PEG therapy. PEG was started at an average dose of 1 g/kg body weight/d and parents were asked to adjust the dose to yield 1 to 2 soft painless stools/d. Data from the history and physical examination were collected initially and at short-term (<or=4 months) and long-term (>or=6 months) follow-up.
RESULTS: 75 otherwise healthy children received PEG for functional constipation. The mean age was 17 months (range, 1 to 24 months) and the mean duration of constipation was 10 months (range, 0.5 to 23 months). The mean duration of short-term follow-up was 2 months and mean duration of long-term follow-up was 11 months. The mean effective short-term PEG dose was 1.1 g/kg body weight/d and the mean long-term dose was 0.8 g/kg body weight/d. Constipation was relieved in 85% with short-term and in 91% with long-term PEG therapy. Adverse effects were mild and included diarrhea, which disappeared with lowering the dose. No subjects stopped PEG because of adverse effects.
CONCLUSION: PEG is effective, well tolerated and appeared safe for the treatment of functional constipation in children<2 years of age.
AD
Division of General Pediatrics, University of Iowa, Iowa City 52242-1083, USA. vera-loening-baucke@uiowa.edu
PMID
62
TI
Double-blind randomized evaluation of clinical and biological tolerance of polyethylene glycol 4000 versus lactulose in constipated children.
AU
Dupont C, Leluyer B, Maamri N, Morali A, Joye JP, Fiorini JM, Abdelatif A, Baranes C, Benoît S, Benssoussan A, Boussioux JL, Boyer P, Brunet E, Delorme J, François-Cecchin S, Gottrand F, Grassart M, Hadji S, Kalidjian A, Languepin J, Leissler C, Lejay D, Livon D, Lopez JP, Mougenot JF, Risse JC, Rizk C, Roumaneix D, Schirrer J, Thoron B, Kalach N
SO
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2005;41(5):625.
 
OBJECTIVES: To assess the safety of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 laxative without additional salts in pediatric patients.
STUDY DESIGN: This was a 3-month multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, lactulose-controlled, parallel study enrolling 96 ambulatory constipated children aged 6 months to 3 years, treated daily with 4-8 g PEG or 3.33 g-6.66 g lactulose. Total protein, albumin, iron, electrolytes, and vitamins B9 (folates), A and D (25OHD3) were measured in blood before and after treatment (day 84) in a central laboratory.
RESULTS: The percentage of children with at least one value out of normal range at day 84 with respect to baseline status (with or without at least one value out of normal range), i.e. the primary endpoint, was 87% and 90% in the PEG and lactulose groups, respectively, without any difference between groups. The whole blood parameters showed no qualitative or quantitative treatment-related changes. Vitamin A values were above normal range in 56% and 41% of children at baseline versus 33% and 36% at day 84 in the PEG and lactulose groups, respectively. Iron values were similarly under normal range in 47% and 51% at baseline versus 42% and 51% at day 84. Clinical tolerance was similar for both treatments except for vomiting and flatulence, which were significantly higher with lactulose. Significantly higher improvements were evidenced with PEG regarding stool consistency, appetite, fecaloma and use of additional laxatives.
CONCLUSION: This 3-month study in 96 constipated children aged 6 months to 3 years confirms the long-term tolerance of PEG 4000 in pediatrics and indicates a PEG efficacy similar to or greater than that of lactulose.
AD
Hôpital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, Service de Néonatologie, Paris, France. christophe.dupont@svp.ap-hop-paris.fr
PMID