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Medline ® Abstracts for References 2,15,93

of 'Chronic functional constipation and fecal incontinence in infants and children: Treatment'

2
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Evaluation and treatment of functional constipation in infants and children: evidence-based recommendations from ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN.
AU
Tabbers MM, DiLorenzo C, Berger MY, Faure C, Langendam MW, Nurko S, Staiano A, Vandenplas Y, Benninga MA
SO
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2014;58(2):258.
 
BACKGROUND: Constipation is a pediatric problem commonly encountered by many health care workers in primary, secondary, and tertiary care. To assist medical care providers in the evaluation and management of children with functional constipation, the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition were charged with the task of developing a uniform document of evidence-based guidelines.
METHODS: Nine clinical questions addressing diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic topics were formulated. A systematic literature search was performed from inception to October 2011 using Embase, MEDLINE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, and PsychInfo databases. The approach of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation was applied to evaluate outcomes. For therapeutic questions, quality of evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system. Grading the quality of evidence for the other questions was performed according to theclassification system of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. During 3 consensus meetings, all recommendations were discussed and finalized. The group members voted on each recommendation, using the nominal voting technique. Expert opinion was used where no randomized controlled trials were available to support the recommendation.
RESULTS: This evidence-based guideline provides recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of children with functional constipation to standardize and improve their quality of care. In addition, 2 algorithms were developed, one for the infants<6 months of age and the other for older infants and children.
CONCLUSIONS: This document is intended to be used in daily practice and as a basis for further clinical research. Large well-designed clinical trials are necessary with regard to diagnostic evaluation and treatment.
AD
Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
PMID
15
TI
Controversies in the management of chronic constipation.
AU
Loening-Baucke V
SO
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2001;32 Suppl 1:S38.
 
AD
Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
PMID
93
TI
Cow's-milk-free diet as a therapeutic option in childhood chronic constipation.
AU
Irastorza I, Ibañez B, Delgado-Sanzonetti L, Maruri N, Vitoria JC
SO
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2010;51(2):171.
 
OBJECTIVES: It has been reported that a number of children with constipation respond to a diet free of cow's-milk (CM) proteins, although evidence is lacking to support an immunoglobulin E-mediated mechanism.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed an open-label crossover study comparing CM and rice milk in 69 children who fulfilled Rome III criteria for chronic constipation. Clinical, physical, and immunologic parameters of patients who responded (R) and who did not respond (NR) to a CM-free diet were compared.
RESULTS: Thirty-five of the 69 children (51%) improved during the first CM-free diet phase, 8 of these did not develop constipation when CM was reintroduced, and 27 children (39%) developed constipation during the CM challenge and improved during the second CM-free diet phase (R group). Thirty-four children (49%) did not improve during the first CM-free diet phase (NR group). Bowel movements per week among R children significantly increased compared with NR children (R: 2.8-7.7 vs NR: 2.6-2.7) (P<0.001). Seventy-eight percent of the children with developmental delay responded to the CM-free diet (P = 0.007). No significant statistical difference was found between the R and NR children in terms of fiber and milk consumption; atopic or allergic history; full-blood eosinophil count and percentage, and lymphocyte populations; immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin (Ig)G subclasses, total IgE; and serum-specific immunoglobulin E for CM proteins.
CONCLUSIONS: A clear association between CM consumption and constipation has been found in more than one third of children. However, analytical parameters do not demonstrate an immunoglobulin E-mediated immunologic mechanism.
AD
Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Hospital de Cruces, Bilbao, Spain. iirastorza@osakidetza.net
PMID