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Medline ® Abstracts for References 118-122

of 'Chronic functional constipation and fecal incontinence in infants and children: Treatment'

118
TI
Antegrade colonic enemas and intestinal diversion are highly effective in the management of children with intractable constipation.
AU
Christison-Lagay ER, Rodriguez L, Kurtz M, St Pierre K, Doody DP, Goldstein AM
SO
J Pediatr Surg. 2010;45(1):213.
 
PURPOSE: Intractable constipation in children is an uncommon but debilitating condition. When medical therapy fails, surgery is warranted; but the optimal surgical approach has not been clearly defined. We reviewed our experience with operative management of intractable constipation to identify predictors of success and to compare outcomes after 3 surgical approaches: antegrade continence enema (ACE), enteral diversion, and primary resection.
METHODS: A retrospective review of pediatric patients undergoing ACE, diversion, or resection for intractable, idiopathic constipation from 1994 to 2007 was performed. Satisfactory outcome was defined as minimal fecal soiling and passage of stool at least every other day (ACE, resection) or functional enterostomy without abdominal distension (diversion).
RESULTS: Forty-four patients (range = 1-26 years, mean = 9 years) were included. Sixteen patients underwent ACE, 19 underwent primary diversion (5 ileostomy, 14 colostomy), and 9 had primary colonic resections. Satisfactory outcomes were achieved in 63%, 95%, and 22%, respectively. Of the 19 patients diverted, 14 had intestinal continuity reestablished at a mean of 27 months postdiversion, with all of these having a satisfactory outcome at an average follow-up of 56 months. Five patients underwent closure of the enterostomy without resection, whereas the remainder underwent resection of dysmotile colon based on preoperative colonic manometry studies. Of those undergoing ACE procedures, age younger than 12 years was a predictor of success, whereas preoperative colonic manometry was not predictive of outcome. Second manometry 1 year post-ACE showed improvement in all patients tested. On retrospective review, patient noncompliance contributed to ACE failure.
CONCLUSIONS: Antegrade continence enema and enteral diversion are very effective initial procedures in the management of intractable constipation. Greater than 90% of diverted patients have an excellent outcome after the eventual restoration of intestinal continuity. Colon resection should not be offered as initial therapy, as it is associated with nearly 80% failure rate and the frequent need for additional surgery.
AD
Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
PMID
119
TI
Impact of cecostomy and antegrade colonic enemas on management of fecal incontinence and constipation: ten years of experience in pediatric population.
AU
Wong AL, Kravarusic D, Wong SL
SO
J Pediatr Surg. 2008;43(8):1445.
 
BACKGROUND: In childhood and adolescence, fecal soiling represents a psychologically devastating problem. Physical and emotional distress associated with daily rectal enemas is minimized by the introduction of a cecostomy tube for colonic cleansing with antegrade colonic enemas (ACEs).
PATIENTS AND METHODS: Over a period of 10 years (1997-2007), we performed "button" cecostomies in 69 pediatric patients with fecal soiling secondary to a variety of disorders; laparoscopic procedures were performed in 40 and open procedures in 29. Mean postoperative follow-up was 4.03 SD +/- 1.76 years. Cleansing protocols differed between patients.
RESULTS: We adopted a standardized questionnaire concerning management of incontinence/intractable constipation before and after button cecostomy insertion to assess the long-term impact of ACE on symptom severity and quality of life. Complications included tube dislodgement (n = 9), development of granulation tissue (n = 11), decubitus ulcer (n = 5), and infection (n = 3). Patient/parents satisfaction (appraisal scale 1-3) and improvement of quality of life achieved statistical significance for both (P<.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Since button cecostomy and ACE were introduced in our institution as a management option, the treatment of fecal incontinence and intractable constipation significantly improved in terms of efficacy and patient compliance and also resulted in greater patient and parent satisfaction.
AD
Pediatric Surgery Department, Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. wongal87@yahoo.ca
PMID
120
TI
Long-term follow-up of patients after antegrade continence enema procedure.
AU
Siddiqui AA, Fishman SJ, Bauer SB, Nurko S
SO
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2011;52(5):574.
 
BACKGROUND: Antegrade continence enema (ACE) has become an important therapeutic modality in the treatment of intractable constipation and fecal incontinence. There are little data available on the long-term performance of the ACE procedure in children.
METHODS: A retrospective review of patients who underwent the ACE procedure was conducted. Irrigation characteristics and complications were noted. Outcome was assessed for individual encounters based on frequency of bowel movements, incontinence, pain, and predictability.
RESULTS: One hundred seventeen patients underwent an ACE. One hundred five patients had at least 6 months of follow-up, and were included in the analysis. Diagnoses included myelodysplasia (39%), functional intractable constipation (26%), anorectal malformations (21%), nonrelaxing internal anal sphincter (7%), cerebral palsy (3%), and other diagnoses (4%). The average follow-up was 68 months (range 7-178 months). At the last follow-up, 69% of patients had successful bowel management. Of the 31% of patients who did not have successful bowel management, 20% were using the ACE despite suboptimal results, 10% required surgical removal, and 2% were not using the ACE because of behavioral opposition to it. Patients were started on normal saline, but were switched to GoLYTELY (PEG-3350 and electrolyte solution) if there was an inadequate response (61% at final encounter). Additives were needed in 34% of patients. The average irrigation dose was 23±0.7 mL/kg. The average toilet sitting time was 51.7±3.5 minutes, with infusions running for 12.1±1.2 minutes. Stomal complications occurred in 63% (infection, leakage, and stenosis) of patients, 33% required surgical revision and 6% eventually required diverting ostomies.
CONCLUSIONS: Long-term use of the ACE gives successful results in 69% of patients, whereas 63% had a stoma-related complication and 33% required surgical revision of the stoma.
AD
Center for Motility and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts 02155, USA.
PMID
121
TI
Ten-year experience using antegrade enemas in children.
AU
Mugie SM, Machado RS, Mousa HM, Punati JB, Hogan M, Benninga MA, Di Lorenzo C
SO
J Pediatr. 2012 Oct;161(4):700-4. Epub 2012 Jun 9.
 
OBJECTIVE: To describe a single-center, 10-year experience with the use of antegrade enemas.
STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of 99 patients treated with antegrade enemas at Nationwide Children's Hospital.
RESULTS: Study subjects (median age 8 years) were followed for a mean time of 46 months (range 2-125 months) after cecostomy placement. Seventy-one patients had the cecostomy placed percutaneously and 28 by surgery. Thirty-five patients had functional constipation and 64 patients an organic disease (spinal abnormalities, cerebral palsy, imperforate anus, Hirschsprung's disease). While using antegrade enemas, 71% became symptom-free, in 20 subjects symptoms improved, in 2 subjects symptoms did not change, and in 7 subjects symptoms worsened. Poor outcome was associated with surgical placement of the cecostomy (P<.001), younger age (P = .02), shorter duration of symptoms (P = .01), history of Hirschsprung's disease (P = .05), cerebral palsy (P = .03), previous abdominal surgery (P =.001), and abnormal colonic manometry (P = .004). In 88%, successful irrigation solution included use of a stimulant laxative, and subjects who used a stimulant did significantly better (P<.001) than subjects who started without a stimulant. In 13 patients, the cecostomy was removed 49.7 months after placement without recurrence of symptoms. Major complications occurred in 12 patients and minor complications in 47.
CONCLUSIONS: Antegrade enemas represent a successful and relatively safe therapeutic option in children with severe defecatory disorders. Prognostic factors are identified.
AD
Division of Gastroenterology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH; Division of Gastroenterology, Emma Children's Hospital, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: s.m.mugie@amc.nl.
PMID
122
TI
Contemporary short- and long-term outcomes in patients with unremitting constipation and fecal incontinence treated with an antegrade continence enema.
AU
Dolejs SC, Smith JK Jr, Sheplock J, Croffie JM, Rescorla FJ
SO
J Pediatr Surg. 2017;52(1):79. Epub 2016 Oct 27.
 
PURPOSE: The primary aim of this study is to determine the natural history of patients who undergo an antegrade continence enema (ACE) procedure including complications, functional results, and long-term outcomes.
METHODS: Patients aged 3-18years who underwent an ACE procedure from 2008 to 2015 for unremitting constipation and fecal incontinence with at least thirty day follow-up were included. Patients with congenital anatomic disorders of the spine, rectum, and anus were excluded.
RESULTS: A total of 93 patients were included in the analysis with an average age of 10+/-4years and follow-up of 26+/-41months. The ACE procedure was rapidly effective, with 99% of patients experiencing improvement at 1month. At the end of follow-up, 83% of patients had normal bowel function, and 95% of patients noted improvement. Amongst patients with at least 24months of follow-up (n=51), 43% successfully stopped using their ACE at an average of 40+/-27months. Overall morbidity was 55%, mostly related to minor complications. However, 13% of patients required an additional operation.
CONCLUSION: The ACE procedure is very successful in the treatment of unremitting constipation with fecal incontinence in appropriately selected patients.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV.
AD
Indiana University School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Surgery.
PMID