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Medline ® Abstracts for References 25,26,62-65

of 'Chemotherapy-induced alopecia'

25
TI
Scalp cooling for hair preservation and associated characteristics in 1411 chemotherapy patients - results of the Dutch Scalp Cooling Registry.
AU
van den Hurk CJ, Peerbooms M, van de Poll-Franse LV, Nortier JW, Coebergh JW, Breed WP
SO
Acta Oncol. 2012 Apr;51(4):497-504. Epub 2012 Feb 6.
 
BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a frequently occurring side effect of cancer treatment with a high psychological impact which can be prevented by scalp cooling. With this multi-centre patient series we estimated the results of scalp cooling for currently used chemotherapies to provide patient information and we identified characteristics associated with the results.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: The Dutch Scalp Cooling Registry collected data on scalp-cooled patients in 28 Dutch hospitals. Nurses and patients completed questionnaires on patients, chemotherapy and scalp cooling characteristics. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associated characteristics of the scalp cooling result.
RESULTS: Overall, 50% of the 1411 scalp-cooled patients did not wear a head cover during their last chemotherapy session. Patients were satisfied with the results in 8% of cases after TAC chemotherapy and up to 95% after paclitaxel treatment. Besides type of chemotherapy, higher dose and shorterinfusion time, older age, female gender and non-West-European type of hair significantly increased the proportion head cover use. Hair length, quantity, chemical manipulation (dyeing, waving, colouring), wetting hair before scalp cooling, and treatment with chemotherapy ever before did not influence the degree of head covering among patients.
CONCLUSIONS: Scalp cooling results as recorded in this open patient registry were positive for most regimens, justifying it's use by all eligible patients, except for those needing TAC. Lengthening infusion time may improve the results.
AD
Eindhoven Cancer Registry/Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Research Department, Eindhoven, The Netherlands. c.vd.hurk@ikz.nl
PMID
26
TI
Sensor-controlled scalp cooling to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia in female cancer patients.
AU
Fehr MK, Welter J, Sell W, Jung R, Felberbaum R
SO
Curr Oncol. 2016;23(6):e576.
 
BACKGROUND: Scalp cooling has been used since the 1970s to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia, one of the most common and psychologically troubling side effects of chemotherapy. Currently available scalp cooling systems demonstrate varying results in terms of effectiveness and tolerability.
METHODS: For the present prospective study, 55 women receiving neoadjuvant, adjuvant, or palliative chemotherapy were enrolled. The aim was to assess the effectiveness of a sensor-controlled scalp cooling system (DigniCap: Sysmex Europe GmbH, Norderstedt, Germany) to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia in breast or gynecologic cancer patients receiving 1 of 7 regimens. Clinical assessments, satisfaction questionnaires, and alopecia evaluations [World Health Organization (who) grading for toxicity]were completed at baseline, at each cycle, and at completion of chemotherapy.
RESULTS: Of the 55 patients, 78% underwent scalp cooling until completion of chemotherapy. In multivariate analysis, younger women and those receiving paclitaxel weekly or paclitaxel-carboplatin experienced less alopecia. The compound successful outcome ("no head covering" plus "who grade 0/1") was observed in all patients 50 years of age and younger receiving 4 cycles of docetaxel-cyclophosphamide or 6 cycles of paclitaxel-carboplatin. Conversely, alopecia was experienced by all women receiving triplet polychemotherapy (6 cycles of docetaxel-doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide). For women receiving sequential polychemotherapy regimens (3 cycles of fluorouracil-epirubicin-cyclophosphamide followed by 3 cycles of docetaxel or 4 cycles of doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide followed by 4 cycles of docetaxel), the subgroup 50 years of age and younger experienced a 43% success rate compared with a 10% rate for the subgroup pf older women receiving the same regimens.
CONCLUSIONS: The ability of scalp cooling to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia varies with the chemotherapy regimen and the age of the patient. Use of a compound endpoint with subjective and objective measures provides insightful and practical information when counselling patients.
AD
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cantonal Hospital Frauenfeld, Switzerland.
PMID
62
TI
The effectiveness of scalp hypothermia in preventing cyclophosphamide-induced alopecia.
AU
Parker R
SO
Oncol Nurs Forum. 1987;14(6):49.
 
AD
PMID
63
TI
Clinical observations of scalp cooling in patients receiving multidrug chemotherapy
AU
Knobf M, Kalm D, Mealia M
SO
Oncol Nurs Forum. 1989;16(suppl):200.
 
AD
64
TI
Failure of scalp hypothermia to prevent hair loss when cyclophosphamide is added to doxorubicin and vincristine.
AU
Middleton J, Franks D, Buchanan RB, Hall V, Smallwood J, Williams CJ
SO
Cancer Treat Rep. 1985;69(4):373.
 
Scalp hypothermia can prevent alopecia caused by low doses of doxorubicin alone or in simple combinations. The technique was used in 60 patients with breast cancer (24 receiving adjuvant therapy; 36 with advanced recurrent disease) receiving chemotherapy with iv doxorubicin (40 mg/m2) and vincristine (1.4 mg/m2) on Day 1 together with oral cyclophosphamide (200 mg/m2) on Days 2-5. The patients' desire to continue scalp hypothermia, reflecting their perception of benefit, and an objective assessment of hair retention were the study end points. The mean number of cycles of chemotherapy given (6.1 in patients receiving adjuvant therapy; 3.8 in those with advanced disease) exceeded the number of cycles with hypothermia (2.1 in patients receiving adjuvant therapy; 1.6 in those with advanced disease); no patients retained enough hair to encourage them to continue scalp hypothermia throughout chemotherapy. All patients were rated as having poor hair retention. Scalp hypothermia is ineffective when used with combinations of drugs, each causing alopecia, or with high doses of doxorubicin.
AD
PMID
65
TI
Ineffectiveness of scalp hypothermia in the prevention of alopecia in patients treated with doxorubicin and cisplatin combinations.
AU
Wheelock JB, Myers MB, Krebs HB, Goplerud DR
SO
Cancer Treat Rep. 1984;68(11):1387.
 
Eleven patients were studied to determine the effectiveness of scalp hypothermia in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced hair loss. Scalp hypothermia was induced by the Kold Kap. The cytotoxic regimen used consisted of either cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide or cisplatin, doxorubicin, and methotrexate given at monthly intervals. All 11 patients required a wig by the end of the fifth course of chemotherapy because of severe hair loss. Ten of the 11 patients (91%) had severe hair loss by the end of the second course of chemotherapy. These results suggest that scalp hypothermia as used in this study is ineffective in preventing chemotherapy-induced alopecia in patients treated with cisplatin and doxorubicin drug combinations in doses commonly used for treatment of gynecologic malignancies.
AD
PMID