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Medline ® Abstracts for References 2,56-58

of 'Chemotherapy-induced alopecia'

2
TI
A practitioner's guide to cancer-related alopecia.
AU
Dorr VJ
SO
Semin Oncol. 1998;25(5):562.
 
Alopecia due to the side effects of the treatment of cancer is one of the most common and emotionally troublesome effects of cancer therapy. Preventive measures, primarily scalp hypothermia, can be effective in some cases, but the worry of subsequent scalp metastasis remains. Investigative studies in animals are hindered by a poor animal alopecia model. Several promising agents require translation into clinical practice. Until then, disguising the alopecia with wigs, hats, or turbans remains the mainstay of treatment.
AD
Ellis Fischel Cancer Center, University of Missouri, Columbia 65203, USA.
PMID
56
TI
Scalp hypothermia in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia.
AU
Vendelbo Johansen L
SO
Acta Radiol Oncol. 1985;24(2):113.
 
Alopecia is a common side effect of cancer chemotherapy, especially in combination with regimens with doxorubicin (Adriamycin). The effect of scalp hypothermia in connection with chemotherapy was evaluated as hair protection in 61 women with disseminated breast carcinoma, where earlier treatment routines had caused wig-requiring alopecia in nearly all patients. The cooling was performed with a gel-helmet (Hypotherm Gel-Kap). Of the 61 patients, 47 (77%) had no or slight, not wig-demanding hair loss, and 14 (23%) had severe (wig-demanding) hair loss. Seven patients had liver dysfunction; in 5 of these severe hair loss was observed; 2 had slight hair loss. Eighty-three per cent of the patients with normal liver function had no hair loss. Treatment tolerance was found to be good, and side effects were minimal. The method is found to be simple, effective and inexpensive, though still not technically optimal.
AD
PMID
57
TI
Scalp cooling has no place in the prevention of alopecia in adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.
AU
Tollenaar RA, Liefers GJ, Repelaer van Driel OJ, van de Velde CJ
SO
Eur J Cancer. 1994;30A(10):1448.
 
35 patients were studied to determine the effectiveness of scalp hypothermia in the prevention of alopecia caused by adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Scalp hypothermia was induced by the newly developed Theracool cooling machine. The chemotherapeutic regimen consisted of one perioperative course of doxorubicin 50 mg/m2, cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2 and 5-fluorouracil 600 mg/m2 (EORTC protocol 10854). Only 4 (11%) patients showed acceptable hair preservation (no or minor alopecia). 12 patients (34%) had moderate alopecia, all requiring a wig. 19 patients (54%) had complete alopecia. No scalp metastases were observed after scalp cooling. These results and a review of the literature suggest that scalp hypothermia to prevent alopecia may only be effective in a cytotoxic regimen containing an anthracycline as the sole alopecia-inducing agent. With current adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer, in which a combination of cyclophosphamide and an anthracycline is often used, there is no place for scalp hypothermia.
AD
Department of Surgery, University Hospital Leiden, The Netherlands.
PMID
58
TI
Adriamycin alopecia prevented by cold air scalp cooling.
AU
Symonds RP, McCormick CV, Maxted KJ
SO
Am J Clin Oncol. 1986;9(5):454.
 
Preliminary studies are reported on the effectiveness of cold air scalp cooling to prevent alopecia in patients receiving Adriamycin. Cold air produced in a novel way using a vortex refrigeration tube was applied to the scalp for 15 min before and 30 min after the administration of Adriamycin and other cytotoxic agents. Sixteen of 26 patients had no hair loss, four had slight hair loss, and six required a wig. Two subgroups fared particularly well. Four of four patients treated with ABVD for Hodgkin's disease and nine of 13 treated with Adriamycin (40 mg/m2) and vincristine (2 mg) for breast cancer had no hair loss.
AD
PMID