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Medline ® Abstracts for References 15,25,26

of 'Chemotherapy-induced alopecia'

15
TI
Pathobiology of chemotherapy-induced hair loss.
AU
Paus R, Haslam IS, Sharov AA, Botchkarev VA
SO
Lancet Oncol. 2013;14(2):e50.
 
Hair loss can be a psychologically devastating adverse effect of chemotherapy, but satisfactory management strategies for chemotherapy-induced alopecia remain elusive. In this Review we focus on the complex pathobiology of this side-effect. We discuss the clinical features and current management approaches, then draw upon evidence from mouse models and human hair-follicle organ-culture studies to explore the main pathobiology principles and explain why chemotherapy-induced alopecia is so challenging to manage. P53-dependent apoptosis of hair-matrix keratinocytes and chemotherapy-induced hair-cycle abnormalities, driven by the dystrophic anagen or dystrophic catagen pathway, play important parts in the degree of hair-follicle damage, alopecia phenotype, and hair-regrowth pattern. Additionally, the degree of hair-follicle stem-cell damage determines whether chemotherapy-induced alopecia is reversible. We highlight the need for carefully designed preclinical research models to generate novel, clinically relevant pointers to how this condition may be overcome.
AD
Department of Dermatology, University of Lübeck, Lübeck D-23538, Germany. ralf.paus@manchester.ac.uk
PMID
25
TI
Scalp cooling for hair preservation and associated characteristics in 1411 chemotherapy patients - results of the Dutch Scalp Cooling Registry.
AU
van den Hurk CJ, Peerbooms M, van de Poll-Franse LV, Nortier JW, Coebergh JW, Breed WP
SO
Acta Oncol. 2012 Apr;51(4):497-504. Epub 2012 Feb 6.
 
BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a frequently occurring side effect of cancer treatment with a high psychological impact which can be prevented by scalp cooling. With this multi-centre patient series we estimated the results of scalp cooling for currently used chemotherapies to provide patient information and we identified characteristics associated with the results.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: The Dutch Scalp Cooling Registry collected data on scalp-cooled patients in 28 Dutch hospitals. Nurses and patients completed questionnaires on patients, chemotherapy and scalp cooling characteristics. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associated characteristics of the scalp cooling result.
RESULTS: Overall, 50% of the 1411 scalp-cooled patients did not wear a head cover during their last chemotherapy session. Patients were satisfied with the results in 8% of cases after TAC chemotherapy and up to 95% after paclitaxel treatment. Besides type of chemotherapy, higher dose and shorterinfusion time, older age, female gender and non-West-European type of hair significantly increased the proportion head cover use. Hair length, quantity, chemical manipulation (dyeing, waving, colouring), wetting hair before scalp cooling, and treatment with chemotherapy ever before did not influence the degree of head covering among patients.
CONCLUSIONS: Scalp cooling results as recorded in this open patient registry were positive for most regimens, justifying it's use by all eligible patients, except for those needing TAC. Lengthening infusion time may improve the results.
AD
Eindhoven Cancer Registry/Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Research Department, Eindhoven, The Netherlands. c.vd.hurk@ikz.nl
PMID
26
TI
Sensor-controlled scalp cooling to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia in female cancer patients.
AU
Fehr MK, Welter J, Sell W, Jung R, Felberbaum R
SO
Curr Oncol. 2016;23(6):e576.
 
BACKGROUND: Scalp cooling has been used since the 1970s to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia, one of the most common and psychologically troubling side effects of chemotherapy. Currently available scalp cooling systems demonstrate varying results in terms of effectiveness and tolerability.
METHODS: For the present prospective study, 55 women receiving neoadjuvant, adjuvant, or palliative chemotherapy were enrolled. The aim was to assess the effectiveness of a sensor-controlled scalp cooling system (DigniCap: Sysmex Europe GmbH, Norderstedt, Germany) to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia in breast or gynecologic cancer patients receiving 1 of 7 regimens. Clinical assessments, satisfaction questionnaires, and alopecia evaluations [World Health Organization (who) grading for toxicity]were completed at baseline, at each cycle, and at completion of chemotherapy.
RESULTS: Of the 55 patients, 78% underwent scalp cooling until completion of chemotherapy. In multivariate analysis, younger women and those receiving paclitaxel weekly or paclitaxel-carboplatin experienced less alopecia. The compound successful outcome ("no head covering" plus "who grade 0/1") was observed in all patients 50 years of age and younger receiving 4 cycles of docetaxel-cyclophosphamide or 6 cycles of paclitaxel-carboplatin. Conversely, alopecia was experienced by all women receiving triplet polychemotherapy (6 cycles of docetaxel-doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide). For women receiving sequential polychemotherapy regimens (3 cycles of fluorouracil-epirubicin-cyclophosphamide followed by 3 cycles of docetaxel or 4 cycles of doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide followed by 4 cycles of docetaxel), the subgroup 50 years of age and younger experienced a 43% success rate compared with a 10% rate for the subgroup pf older women receiving the same regimens.
CONCLUSIONS: The ability of scalp cooling to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia varies with the chemotherapy regimen and the age of the patient. Use of a compound endpoint with subjective and objective measures provides insightful and practical information when counselling patients.
AD
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cantonal Hospital Frauenfeld, Switzerland.
PMID