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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 269

of 'Chemotherapy hepatotoxicity and dose modification in patients with liver disease'

269
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Protracted results of dose-intensive therapy using cyclophosphamide, carmustine, and continuous infusion etoposide with autologous stem cell support in patients with relapse or refractory Hodgkin's disease: a phase II study from the North American Marrow Transplant Group.
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Fleming DR, Wolff SN, Fay JW, Brown RA, Lynch JP, Bolwell BJ, Stevens DA, Goodman SA, Greer JP, Stein RS, Pineiro LA, Collins RH, Goldsmith LJ, Herzig GP, Herzig RH
SO
Leuk Lymphoma. 1999;35(1-2):91.
 
To determine the long-term results of high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell support in relapsed or primary refractory Hodgkin disease patients. One hundred and thirty-one patients with relapsed or primary refractory Hodgkin's disease were treated with a dose-intensive therapy protocol consisting of etoposide (2400 mg/m2 continuous intravenous infusion) cyclophosphamide (7200 mg/m2 intravenously), and carmustine (300-600 mg/m2 intravenously) CBVi. All patients had previously failed conventional chemoradiotherapy. Severe toxicities were related to infectious, hepatic, and pulmonary complications. Fatal, regimen-related toxicity was 19%; liver and lung dysfunction, as well as infection, were the most frequent problems. Ninety-one (69%) of the patients achieved a complete response (CR) (95% CI = 59% to 75%) after CBVi and autologous stem cell infusion. With a median follow-up of 5.1 years (range 3.0 to 9.5 years), overall and event-free survival are 44% (95% CI = 33% to 47%) and 38% (95% CI = 28% to 46%) respectively. While univariate analysis did not reveal a statistically significant variable to predict a better response, responsiveness to therapy demonstrated a trend. We conclude that CBVi is an effective therapy for relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's disease, producing long-term, durable remissions.
AD
University of Louisville, School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Division of Hematology/Oncology, KY 40202, USA.
PMID