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Medline ® Abstracts for References 1,2

of 'Cancer pain management: General principles and risk management for patients receiving opioids'

1
TI
High prevalence of pain in patients with cancer in a large population-based study in The Netherlands.
AU
van den Beuken-van Everdingen MH, de Rijke JM, Kessels AG, Schouten HC, van Kleef M, Patijn J
SO
Pain. 2007;132(3):312. Epub 2007 Oct 3.
 
UNLABELLED: At present, no definite conclusions can be drawn about the real extent of the pain suffered by cancer patients. A population-based study was conducted to obtain reliable information about the prevalence and severity of pain in cancer patients (all phases) and about predictors of pain. A representative sample of cancer patients was recruited in the area from a cancer registry. Pain was assessed by the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). Adequacy of pain treatment was assessed with the Pain Management Index (PMI). We found that 55% of the 1429 respondents had experienced pain past week; in 44% (n=351), the pain was moderate to severe (BPI score>or= 4). Total prevalence of pain/moderate to severe pain was present in 49%/41% in patients with curative treatment>or=6 months ago, 57%/43% in patients with current curative treatment or treatment<6 months ago, 56%/43% in patients with current palliative anti-cancer treatment and in 75%/70% in patients for whom treatment was no longer feasible. Positive predictors of the prevalence of pain were lower education level, more advanced disease and haematological (excluding (non)-Hodgkin lymphoma), gastro-intestinal, lung, or breast malignancies. According to the PMI, analgesic treatment was inadequate in 42% of the patients. Negative predictors of adequate treatment were current curative anti-cancer treatment and low education level.
CONCLUSION: A substantial proportion of cancer patients does suffer from moderate to severe pain and does not receive adequate pain treatment.
AD
University Hospital Maastricht, Pain Management and Research Centre, P.O. Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, The Netherlands. mvdb@adcc.azm.nl
PMID
2
TI
Symptom prevalence in patients with incurable cancer: a systematic review.
AU
Teunissen SC, Wesker W, Kruitwagen C, de Haes HC, Voest EE, de Graeff A
SO
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2007;34(1):94.
 
The suffering of patients with incurable cancer is determined to a large degree by the presence and intensity of the symptoms of their disease. Knowledge of symptom prevalence is important for clinical practice. The main aim of this study was to obtain a reliable estimation of symptom prevalence in patients with incurable cancer by performing a systematic review of studies assessing this topic. We included 44 studies (including 25,074 patients) on overall symptom prevalence (Group 1) and six studies (including 2,219 patients) on symptom prevalence during the last one to two weeks of life (Group 2). In these studies, symptom prevalence was assessed by a questionnaire, a standardized interview, or the medical record. We identified 37 symptoms assessed in at least five studies. Almost all symptoms occurred in more than 10% of the patients. Five symptoms (fatigue, pain, lack of energy, weakness, and appetite loss) occurred in more than 50% of the patients of Group 1. Weight loss occurred significantly more often in Group 2 compared to Group 1, and pain, nausea, and urinary symptoms occurred significantly less often. Generally, symptom prevalence was highest if assessed by a questionnaire. The results of this study should be used to guide doctors and nurses in symptom management. Proper attention to symptom burden and suffering should be the basis for individually tailored treatment aimed at improving ormaintaining quality of life of patients in their last period of life.
AD
Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
PMID