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Medline ® Abstracts for References 4,75

of 'Cancer of the appendix and pseudomyxoma peritonei'

4
TI
Primary malignant neoplasms of the appendix: a population-based study from the surveillance, epidemiology and end-results program, 1973-1998.
AU
McCusker ME, CotéTR, Clegg LX, Sobin LH
SO
Cancer. 2002;94(12):3307.
 
BACKGROUND: Cancer of the appendix is an uncommon disease that is rarely suspected rarely before surgery. Although several case series of these tumors have been published, little research has been anchored in population-based data on cancer of the appendix.
METHODS: This analysis included all actively followed cases of appendiceal neoplasms reported to the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER) program between 1973 and 1998. Tumors were classified as "colonic type" adenocarcinoma, mucinous adenocarcinoma, signet ring cell carcinoma, goblet cell carcinoid, and "malignant carcinoid" (SEER only collects data on carcinoids specifically classified as malignant). We compared incidence, overall survival and survival rates by extent of disease at diagnosis.
RESULTS: Between 1973 and 1998, 2117 appendiceal malignancies were reported to the SEER program, of which 1645 cases were included in the analysis. Age-adjusted incidence of cancer of the appendix was 0.12 cases per 1,000,000 people per year. Demographic characteristicsof patients with goblet cell carcinoid tumors were midway between those of patients with malignant carcinoid and all types of adenocarcinomas. After controlling for age and extent of disease at diagnosis, the overall survival rate for patients diagnosed between 1983 and 1997 (n = 1061) was significantly worse for those with signet ring cell carcinoma than for those with any other tumor type (P<0.01). In addition, overall survival rates were better for patients with malignant carcinoid (P = 0.01).
CONCLUSIONS: Demographic characteristics of patients with cancer of the appendix vary by histology. Except for signet ring cell carcinoma and malignant carcinoid, the extent of disease at time of diagnosis is a more important predictor of survival than histology.
AD
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA. mmccuske@epi.umaryland.edu
PMID
75
TI
Appendiceal adenocarcinoma: long-term outcomes after surgical therapy.
AU
Ito H, Osteen RT, Bleday R, Zinner MJ, Ashley SW, Whang EE
SO
Dis Colon Rectum. 2004;47(4):474.
 
PURPOSE: Appendiceal adenocarcinomas are very rare. We analyzed contemporary outcomes associated with surgical therapies for these malignancies.
METHODS: Retrospective outcomes for patients treated at a tertiary academic medical center from 1981 through 2001 were analyzed.
RESULTS: A total of 36 patients (22 females (61 percent) mean age, 52 years) with appendiceal adenocarcinoma were treated. Eighty-eight percent of patients presented with symptoms of acute appendicitis. Eighteen (50 percent) patients underwent curative resection (7 primary right hemicolectomies, 10 appendectomies + subsequent right hemicolectomy, and 1 appendectomy alone). Mean length of follow-up was 55 months. Overall five-year survival rate was 46 percent. The five-year survival rate after curative resection was 61 percent and after palliative surgery was 32 percent ( P<0.05). Among patients who underwent curative resection, factors associated with improved five-year survival rates included histologic type (79 vs. 32 percent for colonic vs. mucinous types, respectively; P<0.05), T stage (75 vs. 47 percent for T1 and 2 vs. T3 and 4, respectively; P<0.05), and tumor grade (100 vs. 46 percent for well-differentiated tumors vs. moderately or poorly differentiated tumors, respectively; P<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing surgery for appendiceal adenocarcinoma can be stratified according to prognostic variables. The role of adjuvant therapies for patients with poor prognostic factors needs to be evaluated in a multi-institutional setting.
AD
Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
PMID