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Medline ® Abstracts for References 4,59,60

of 'Cancer of the appendix and pseudomyxoma peritonei'

4
TI
Primary malignant neoplasms of the appendix: a population-based study from the surveillance, epidemiology and end-results program, 1973-1998.
AU
McCusker ME, CotéTR, Clegg LX, Sobin LH
SO
Cancer. 2002;94(12):3307.
 
BACKGROUND: Cancer of the appendix is an uncommon disease that is rarely suspected rarely before surgery. Although several case series of these tumors have been published, little research has been anchored in population-based data on cancer of the appendix.
METHODS: This analysis included all actively followed cases of appendiceal neoplasms reported to the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER) program between 1973 and 1998. Tumors were classified as "colonic type" adenocarcinoma, mucinous adenocarcinoma, signet ring cell carcinoma, goblet cell carcinoid, and "malignant carcinoid" (SEER only collects data on carcinoids specifically classified as malignant). We compared incidence, overall survival and survival rates by extent of disease at diagnosis.
RESULTS: Between 1973 and 1998, 2117 appendiceal malignancies were reported to the SEER program, of which 1645 cases were included in the analysis. Age-adjusted incidence of cancer of the appendix was 0.12 cases per 1,000,000 people per year. Demographic characteristicsof patients with goblet cell carcinoid tumors were midway between those of patients with malignant carcinoid and all types of adenocarcinomas. After controlling for age and extent of disease at diagnosis, the overall survival rate for patients diagnosed between 1983 and 1997 (n = 1061) was significantly worse for those with signet ring cell carcinoma than for those with any other tumor type (P<0.01). In addition, overall survival rates were better for patients with malignant carcinoid (P = 0.01).
CONCLUSIONS: Demographic characteristics of patients with cancer of the appendix vary by histology. Except for signet ring cell carcinoma and malignant carcinoid, the extent of disease at time of diagnosis is a more important predictor of survival than histology.
AD
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA. mmccuske@epi.umaryland.edu
PMID
59
TI
Surgical and chemotherapy treatment outcomes of goblet cell carcinoid: a tertiary cancer center experience.
AU
Pham TH, Wolff B, Abraham SC, Drelichman E
SO
Ann Surg Oncol. 2006;13(3):370. Epub 2006 Jan 30.
 
BACKGROUND: Goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) is a rare malignant tumor with distinct histological and clinical features. Our goals were to review the surgical and chemotherapy outcomes of patients with GCC.
METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of the Mayo Clinic database from 1984 to 2004 with a prospective follow-up of 57 patients with GCC.
RESULTS: The age at diagnosis (mean +/- SE) was 55 +/- 13 years. The most common presentations were right lower quadrant pain mimicking appendicitis (70%) and right lower quadrant or pelvic mass (25%). Only patients with T4 lesions had positive mesenteric nodes, with a frequency of 28%. Fifty percent of female patients had metastasis to the ovaries. The disease-specific 5-year survivals for stages I, II, III, and IV were 100%, 76%, 22%, and 14%, respectively; the overall mean survival was 47 +/- 3 months. All stage I patients had simple appendectomy. The overall 5-year survival rates for patients with combined stages II to IV who underwent appendectomy versus right hemicolectomy were 43% and 34%, respectively (P = .604). The corresponding survival rates foradjuvant chemotherapy versus no chemotherapy were 32% and 27%, respectively (P = .151).
CONCLUSIONS: The prognosis for patients with GCC tumors correlates well with the American Joint Committee on Cancer stage at initial presentation. Appendectomy alone seems adequate for stage I disease. For staging purposes, right hemicolectomy is appropriate for T4 tumors or stage II to III disease provided that it can be performed with minimal risk. Surgical debulking is a consideration but is controversial. Adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin regimen is minimally effective against GCC.
AD
Department of Colorectal Surgery, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street S.W., Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.
PMID
60
TI
Goblet cell carcinoid of the appendix.
AU
Pahlavan PS, Kanthan R
SO
World J Surg Oncol. 2005;3:36. Epub 2005 Jun 20.
 
BACKGROUND: Goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) of the appendix is a rare neoplasm that share histological features of both adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor. While its malignant potential remains unclear, GCC's are more aggressive than conventional carcinoid. The clinical presentations of this neoplasm are also varied. This review summarizes the published literature on GCC of the appendix. The focus is on its diagnosis, histopathological aspects, clinical manifestations, and management.
METHODS: Published studies in the English language between 1966 to 2004 were identified through Medline keyword search utilizing terms "goblet cell carcinoid," "adenocarcinoid", "mucinous carcinoid" and "crypt cell carcinoma" of the appendix.
RESULTS: Based on the review of 57 published papers encompassing nearly 600 diagnosed patients, the mean age of presentation for GCC of the appendix was 58.89 years with equal representation in both males and females. Accurate diagnosis of this neoplasm requires astute observations within an acutely inflamed appendix as this neoplasm has a prominent pattern of submucosal growth and usually lacks the formation of a well-defined tumor mass. The mesoappendix was involved in 21.64% followed by perineural involvement in 2.06%. The most common clinical presentations in order of frequency were acute appendicitis in 22.5%; asymptomatic in 5.4%; non-localized abdominal pain in 5.15% and an appendicular mass in 3.09%. The most common surgical treatment of choice was appendectomy with right hemicolectomy in 34.70% followed by simple appendectomy in 24.57%. Concomitant distant metastasis at diagnosis was present in 11.16% of patients with the ovaries being the most common site in 3.60% followed by disseminated abdominal carcinomatosis in 1.03%. Local lymph node involvement was seen in 8.76% of patients at the time of diagnosis. The reported 5-year survival ranges from 60 % to 84%. GCC's of the appendix remains a neoplasm of unpredictable biological behavior and thus warrants lifelong surveillance for recurrence of the disease upon diagnosis and successful surgical extirpation.
CONCLUSION: GCC of the appendix is a rare neoplasm. Due to its wide range of presentation, this tumor should be considered as a possible diagnosis in many varied situations leading to abdominal surgery. Histopathological features such as increased number of Paneth cells, increased amount of mucin secretion and presence of pancreatic polypeptide may predict a more aggressive behavior. The advocated plan of management recommended for patients with tumors that involve the adjacent caecum or with high-grade tumors with histological features such as an increased mitotic rate involve initial appendectomy with completion right hemicolectomy due to the high possibility of local recurrence with intraperitoneal seeding prior to lymph node involvement and a 20% risk of metastatic behavior. In female patients with GCC of the appendix regardless of age, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is advocated. In cases with obvious spread of the disease chemotherapy, mostlywith 5-FU and leucovorin is advised. Cytoreductive surgery with adjuvant intraperitoneal chemotherapy can offer improved survival in cases with advanced peritoneal dissemination.
AD
Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. payam.pahlavan@physiologie.uni-heidelberg.de
PMID