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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 100

of 'Cancer of the appendix and pseudomyxoma peritonei'

100
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Systemic chemotherapy and surgical cytoreduction for poorly differentiated and signet ring cell adenocarcinomas of the appendix.
AU
Lieu CH, Lambert LA, Wolff RA, Eng C, Zhang N, Wen S, Rafeeq S, Taggart M, Fournier K, Royal R, Mansfield P, Overman MJ
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Ann Oncol. 2012;23(3):652. Epub 2011 Jun 8.
 
BACKGROUND: Poorly differentiated and signet ring cell adenocarcinomas of the appendix represent a subset with aggressive tumor biology and poor outcomes with few studies evaluating the impact of systemic chemotherapy and cytoreductive surgery (CRS).
PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective chart review of patients with either poorly differentiated and signet ring cell appendiceal adenocarcinomas was completed from 1992 to 2010.
RESULTS: One hundred forty-two patients were identified. Seventy-eight patients with metastatic disease received chemotherapy. Radiographic response was 44%, median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6.9 months, and median overall survival (OS) was 1.7 years. In multivariate analysis, response to chemotherapy [hazard ratio (HR) 0.5; P = 0.02]predicted improved PFS, and complete CRS (HR 0.3; P = 0.004) predicted improved OS. Patients who underwent complete CRS (n = 26) had a median relapse-free survival (RFS) of 1.2 years and a median OS of 4.2 years. In multivariate analysis for this subset, complete cytoreduction score of 0 was significantly correlated with improved RFS (HR 0.07; P = 0.01) and OS (HR 0.02; P = 0.01).
CONCLUSIONS: Systemic chemotherapy appears to be a viable treatment option for patients with metastatic poorly differentiated and signet ring cell appendiceal adenocarcinomas. Complete CRS is associated with improved RFS and OS, though part of this benefit likely reflects the selection of good tumor biology.
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Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA.
PMID