UpToDate
Official reprint from UpToDate®
www.uptodate.com ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All Rights Reserved.

Medline ® Abstracts for References 1,7

of 'Cancer of the appendix and pseudomyxoma peritonei'

1
TI
Appendiceal tumors: retrospective clinicopathologic analysis of appendiceal tumors from 7,970 appendectomies.
AU
Connor SJ, Hanna GB, Frizelle FA
SO
Dis Colon Rectum. 1998;41(1):75.
 
BACKGROUND: Appendiceal tumors are rare and often unexpectedly discovered in an acute situation, in which decision-making is difficult. To help define the most appropriate management, a retrospective analysis was undertaken to describe the clinicopathologic behavior of appendiceal tumors, and the literature was reviewed of the management of the different types of appendiceal tumors.
METHOD: From a single center, a histopathologic database of 7,970 appendectomies, all appendiceal tumors, were identified and case notes reviewed. Analysis of clinical presentation, histopathology, operation, and outcome is presented.
RESULTS: During a 16-year period (7,970 appendectomies), 74 patients (0.9 percent) with appendiceal tumors were identified: 42 carcinoid, 12 benign, and 20 malignant. Acute appendicitis was the most common presentation (49 percent), and 9.5 percent were incidental findings. Primary malignant tumors of the appendix were found in 0.1 percent of all appendectomies. Secondary malignant disease was identified in the appendix of 11 patients, most commonly (55 percent) from patients with primary colorectal disease. There was a high incidence of synchronous and metachronous colorectal cancer in all appendiceal tumors: carcinoids, 10 percent; benign tumors, 33 percent; secondary malignancies, 55 percent; primary malignancies, 89 percent.
CONCLUSION: Appendiceal tumors are uncommon and most often present as appendicitis. Most are benign and can be managed by appendectomy, except adenocarcinomas and carcinoids larger than 2 cm, which are most appropriately managed by right hemicolectomy. A suggested management algorithm is provided. Controversy exists over the management of carcinoids 1 to 2 cm in size and adenocarcinoids. All types of appendiceal tumors have a high incidence of synchronous and metachronous colorectal cancer.
AD
Department of Surgery, Christchurch Hospital, New Zealand.
PMID
7
TI
Carcinoid tumors of the appendix.
AU
Roggo A, Wood WC, Ottinger LW
SO
Ann Surg. 1993;217(4):385.
 
OBJECTIVE: A retrospective study of 41 patients with histologically confirmed diagnosis of appendix carcinoid tumors was undertaken by reviewing the surgical records at Massachusetts General Hospital.
METHODS: There were 8 male and 33 female patients (mean age 32 years). Twenty-two patients (54%) presented with signs and symptoms suggestive of acute appendicitis. In 19 patients (46%) the lesions were discovered incidentally. The tumors were located in 32 patients at the tip, in 6 patients in the middle third, and in 3 patients at the base of the appendix. The tumor was less than 1 cm in diameter in 32 patients, between 1 and 2 cm in 7 patients, and was bigger than 2 cm in 2 patients. In 29 patients, the depth of tumor penetration was confined to the submucosa or to the muscle layers of the appendix, and in 8 patients the serosa was involved. In 4 patients, evidence of tumor extension into the meso-appendicular fat was present, including one patient with a tumor bigger than 2 cm and local lymph-node metastases. Forty patients underwent appendectomy alone. One patient with a tumor size bigger than 2 cm in diameter with positive lymph nodes in the mesoappendix underwent secondary right hemicolectomy. Complete follow-up was achieved in 35 patients, and all patients remained free of tumor recurrence.
CONCLUSIONS: The authors conclude that appendiceal carcinoids are rare and most often are asymptomatic. Tumors of less than 1 cm are adequately managed by appendectomy alone. The appropriate treatment for tumors of 1 to 2 cm continues to be controversial. Right hemicolectomy is recommended for all tumors larger than 2 cm, whereas preference for an aggressive approach should be given in young patients.
AD
General Surgical Services, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston.
PMID