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Bipolar disorder in women: Indications for preconception and prenatal maintenance pharmacotherapy

Victoria Hendrick, MD
Section Editor
Paul Keck, MD
Deputy Editor
David Solomon, MD


For bipolar patients who plan to or do become pregnant, maintenance pharmacotherapy is often indicated to delay or prevent mood episodes [1,2]. Onset of bipolar disorder in women typically occurs during childbearing years [3], and most patients are thus at risk for recurrences during pregnancy [1].

This topic reviews indications for preconception and prenatal maintenance pharmacotherapy in female bipolar patients. Preconception and prenatal maintenance treatment, the teratogenic and postnatal risks of medications used for bipolar disorder, and contraception and preconception counseling for female bipolar patients are discussed separately.

(See "Bipolar disorder in women: Preconception and prenatal maintenance pharmacotherapy".)

(See "Teratogenicity, pregnancy complications, and postnatal risks of antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, lithium, and electroconvulsive therapy".)

(See "Bipolar disorder in women: Contraception and preconception assessment and counseling".)


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Literature review current through: Sep 2016. | This topic last updated: Oct 26, 2015.
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