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Beta-lactam antibiotics: Mechanisms of action and resistance and adverse effects

INTRODUCTION

Beta-lactam antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs, grouped together based upon a shared structural feature, the beta-lactam ring. Beta-lactam antibiotics include:

Penicillins

Cephalosporins

Cephamycins

Carbapenems

                   

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Literature review current through: Sep 2014. | This topic last updated: Apr 2, 2014.
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