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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 85

of 'Barrett's esophagus: Surveillance and management'

85
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Accuracy of EUS in the evaluation of Barrett's esophagus and high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma.
AU
Scotiniotis IA, Kochman ML, Lewis JD, Furth EE, Rosato EF, Ginsberg GG
SO
Gastrointest Endosc. 2001;54(6):689.
 
BACKGROUND: Nonoperative therapy with intent to cure may be considered for patients with Barrett's esophagus and high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma. However, a more advanced stage of disease must be precluded before such treatment. The potential of EUS for this purpose was evaluated.
METHODS: EUS was performed in patients with Barrett's esophagus and high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma based on endoscopy, endoscopic biopsies, and CT before esophagectomy. EUS findings were compared with surgical/pathologic evaluation.
RESULTS: EUS suggested submucosal invasion in 6 patients and lymph node involvement in 5 patients. By surgical/pathologic evaluation, 5 of 22 patients (23%) had unsuspected submucosal invasion and 1 had lymph node involvement. EUS detected all 5 instances of submucosal invasion and the single instance of lymph node involvement. EUS was falsely positive for submucosal invasion in 1 patient and for lymph node involvement in 4 patients. Sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values of preoperative EUS for submucosal invasion were 100%, 94%, and 100%, and for lymph node involvement were 100%, 81%, and 100%, respectively. A nodule or stricture noted by endoscopy was associated with an increased likelihood of submucosal invasion.
CONCLUSIONS: In patients with Barrett's esophagus and high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma, EUS detected otherwise unsuspected submucosal invasion and lymph node involvement. Patients should be evaluated with EUS when nonoperative therapy is contemplated.
AD
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Pathology, and Department of Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.
PMID