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Medline ® Abstracts for References 10-26

of 'Barrett's esophagus: Surveillance and management'

10
TI
The frequency of esophageal cancer in patients with Barrett's esophagus
AU
Spechler SJ
SO
Acta Endoscopica. 1992; 22:541.
 
AD
11
TI
Life expectancy and cancer risk in patients with Barrett's esophagus: a prospective controlled investigation.
AU
Eckardt VF, Kanzler G, Bernhard G
SO
Am J Med. 2001;111(1):33.
 
BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that patients with Barrett's esophagus have a substantially increased risk of esophageal and possibly extra-esophageal cancers. We compared the incidence of cancer and the survival rates of patients with Barrett's esophagus with those observed in patients with achalasia, with Schatzki's ring, and in the general population.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: From 1980 through 1994, 60 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed long-segment Barrett's esophagus without dysplasia were seen in a single gastroenterology consultation office and followed until the Fall of 1999. Cancer incidence and survival rates were compared with age- and sex-matched patients with symptomatic Schatzki's ring (n = 60) and achalasia (n = 60). Survival data were also compared with those of the German population.
RESULTS: During a mean (+/-SD) observation period of 10 +/- 5 years, 2 patients with Barrett's esophagus (3%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0% to 11%) developed esophageal cancer, and 9 (15%; 95% CI: 7% to 27%) developed extra-esophageal cancers. These data differed only slightly from those of patients with Schatzki's ring (esophageal cancer: n = 1, 2%; 95% CI: 0% to 9%; extra-esophageal cancers: n = 9, 15%; 95% CI: 7%-27%) and achalasia (no esophageal cancers, extra-esophageal cancers: n = 3, 5%; 95% CI: 1% to 4%). Estimated 10-year survival was similar in patients with Barrett's esophagus (83%), patients with symptomatic Schatzki's ring (80%), patients with achalasia (87%), and in the general population (82%).
CONCLUSIONS: The cancer risk in patients with Barrett's esophagus has been overestimated. If patients with nondysplastic epithelium are followed, the risk of esophageal cancer is about 1 per 300 patient-years.
AD
Deutsche Klinik für Diagnostik, Wiesbaden, Germany. gastro.eckardt@dkd-wiesbaden.de
PMID
12
TI
Long-term endoscopic surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus. Incidence of dysplasia and adenocarcinoma: a prospective study.
AU
Conio M, Blanchi S, Lapertosa G, Ferraris R, Sablich R, Marchi S, D'Onofrio V, Lacchin T, Iaquinto G, Missale G, Ravelli P, Cestari R, Benedetti G, MacrìG, Fiocca R, Munizzi F, Filiberti R
SO
Am J Gastroenterol. 2003;98(9):1931.
 
OBJECTIVE: Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a premalignant condition for which regular endoscopic follow-up is usually advised. We evaluated the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (AC) in patients with BE and the impact of endoscopic surveillance on mortality from AC.
METHODS: A cohort of newly diagnosed BE patients was studied prospectively. Endoscopic and histological surveillance was recommended every 2 yr. Follow-up status was determined from hospital and registry office records and telephone calls to the patients.
RESULTS: From 1987 to 1997, BE was diagnosed in 177 patients. We excluded three with high-grade dysplasia (HGD) at the time of enrollment. Follow-up was complete in 166 patients (135 male, 31 female). The mean length of endoscopic follow-up was 5.5 yr (range 0.5-13.3). Low-grade dysplasia (LGD) was present initially in 16 patients (9.6%) and found during follow-up in another 24 patients. However, in 75% of cases, LGD was not confirmed onlater biopsies. HGD was found during surveillance in three patients (1.8%), one with simultaneous AC; two with HGD developed AC later. AC was detected in five male patients during surveillance. The incidence of AC was 1/220 (5/1100) patient-years of total follow-up, or 1/183.6 (5/918) patient-years in subjects undergoing endoscopy. Four AC patients died, and one was alive with advanced-stage tumor. The mean number of endoscopies performed for surveillance, rather than for symptoms, was 2.4 (range 1-10) per patient. During the follow-up years the cohort had a total of 528 examinations and more than 4000 biopsies.
CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of AC in BE is low, confirming recent data from the literature reporting an overestimation of cancer risk in these patients. In our patient cohort, surveillance involved a large expenditure of effort but did not prevent any cancer deaths. The benefit of surveillance remains uncertain.
AD
Department of Gastroenterology, National Institute for Cancer Research, Genova, Italy.
PMID
13
TI
Incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in patients with Barrett's esophagus and high-grade dysplasia: a meta-analysis.
AU
Rastogi A, Puli S, El-Serag HB, Bansal A, Wani S, Sharma P
SO
Gastrointest Endosc. 2008;67(3):394.
 
BACKGROUND: Patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) and high-grade dysplasia (HGD) are at a high risk for developing esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the reported rate of cancer development in patients with HGD who were undergoing surveillance has varied among published studies.
OBJECTIVE: To determine an overall precise estimate of cancer incidence in patients with HGD who were undergoing surveillance endoscopy.
DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis.
METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of the published literature and selected original articles that examined patients with histologically proven BE and HGD, patients who had not undergone endoscopic ablation or surgical therapy, patients with 6 months' follow-up, no esophageal cancer at the time of enrollment or within 6 months, and studies in which follow-up was reported in person-time. Two investigators independently conducted the search and abstraction.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENT: The weighted mean event rate was calculated and expressed as the weighted incidence rate, and its CIs were calculated.
RESULTS: The search yielded 4 articles that met the inclusion criteria, and these were analyzed. A total of 236 patients with HGD were followed for 1241 patient-years, and esophageal adenocarcinoma was reported in 69 patients, providing a crude incidence rate of 5.57 per 100 patient-years. The weighted incidence rate was 6.58 per 100 patient-years (95% CI, 4.97-8.19).
LIMITATIONS: A small number of studies that met inclusion criteria.
CONCLUSIONS: In patients with BE and with HGD who were undergoing surveillance, esophageal adenocarcinoma develops in approximately 6 per 100 patient-years during the first few years of follow-up. These data may better inform physicians and patients in management decisions.
AD
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64128, USA.
PMID
14
TI
The incidence of adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus: a prospective study of 170 patients followed 4.8 years.
AU
Drewitz DJ, Sampliner RE, Garewal HS
SO
Am J Gastroenterol. 1997;92(2):212.
 
OBJECTIVES: Barrett's esophagus is a premalignant condition defined by the presence of intestinal metaplasia in the esophagus. Estimates of the incidence of adenocarcinoma developing in patients with Barrett's esophagus vary widely. We prospectively followed a cohort of patients to define the incidence.
METHODS: Between January 1982 and April 1995, all patients undergoing upper endoscopy at the VA Medical Center in Tucson, AZ, were surveyed for Barrett's esophagus. One hundred seventy-seven patients (174 males, three females) were found to have Barrett's esophagus. Seven of 177 were found to have adenocarcinoma either at initial endoscopy or within 6 months, resulting in a prevalence of 4%. One hundred seventy of 177 patients initially lacking cancer were available for systematic survey.
RESULTS: The mean age at the time of Barrett's diagnosis was 62 yr (range 30-85 yr). The mean follow-up period was 57 months or 4.8 yr (range 6-156 months), for a total of 834 patient-years. Adenocarcinoma developed in four patients, an incidence of 1/208 patient-years of follow-up.
CONCLUSIONS: The current series is larger and has a longer follow-up period than previous prospective trials and demonstrates a lower incidence of adenocarcinoma. Surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus for dysplasia remains an appropriate clinical practice.
AD
Section of Gastroenterology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Tucson, Arizona 85723, USA.
PMID
15
TI
Is there publication bias in the reporting of cancer risk in Barrett's esophagus?
AU
Shaheen NJ, Crosby MA, Bozymski EM, Sandler RS
SO
Gastroenterology. 2000;119(2):333.
 
BACKGROUND& AIMS: The published risk of adenocarcinoma in the setting of Barrett's esophagus (BE) varies. Publication bias, the selective reporting of studies featuring positive or extreme results, may result in overestimation of this cancer risk in the literature. The aim of this study was to assess those publications reporting a cancer risk in BE for evidence of publication bias.
METHODS: A MEDLINE search for all published estimates between 1966 and 1998 of cancer risk in BE was performed. All studies reporting a cancer risk expressible in cancers per patient-year of follow-up were retrieved. Bibliographies of these studies were surveyed for additional estimates. All publications that required an initial endoscopy with histologic confirmation of BE and any cancer were included. The relationship of reported cancer risk to size of the study was assessed. Multivariable regression controlling for differences in definition of BE, as well as other study characteristics, was performed. The data were also analyzed by means of a funnel diagram, an epidemiologic method to assess publication bias.
RESULTS: Five hundred fifty-four abstracts were reviewed. Twenty-seven publications met the stated criteria for inclusion. There was a strong correlation between cancer risk and the size of the study, with small studies reporting much higher risks of cancer than larger studies. This association persisted when differences in the definition of BE, retrospective vs. prospective nature of the study, surveillance interval, and the effect of cancer detected in the first year were considered. The funnel diagram analysis suggested publication bias.
CONCLUSIONS: The cancer risk in BE may be overestimated in the literature due to publication bias.
AD
Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, and Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7080, USA. nshaheen@med.unc.edu
PMID
16
TI
Dysplasia and cancer in a large multicenter cohort of patients with Barrett's esophagus.
AU
Sharma P, Falk GW, Weston AP, Reker D, Johnston M, Sampliner RE
SO
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006;4(5):566.
 
BACKGROUND& AIMS: The exact incidence of adenocarcinoma in patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) is not known and is reported to vary from 0.2%-2% per year. Published series of patients with BE have included relatively small numbers of patients with limited duration of follow-up. The goal of this study was to define the prevalence and incidence of dysplasia and cancer and evaluate the paths of progression in a large multicenter cohort of BE patients.
METHODS: The BE study is a multicenter clinical and endoscopic outcomes project involving a single large database of patients with BE. Data from each of the participating centers were merged into the main study database. Cancers and HGD occurring within 12 months of the index endoscopy were regarded as prevalent cases.
RESULTS: One thousand three hundred seventy-six patients met the study criteria (95% white, 14% women); 91 patients had cancer at the initial endoscopy (prevalent cases, 6.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.8%-8.7%). Six hundred eighteen patients were followed for a total of 2546 patient-years; mean follow-up was 4.12 years. Twelve patients developed cancer during follow-up, a cancer incidence of 1 in 212 patient-years of follow-up (0.5% per year; 95% CI, 0%-1.1%). The combined incidence of HGD and/or cancer was 1 in 75 patient-years of follow-up or 1.3% per year (95% CI, 0%-2.2%). Of the 34 patients developing HGD and/or cancer, 18 patients (53%) had at least 2 initial consecutive endoscopies with biopsies revealing nondysplastic mucosa. The incidence of LGD was 4.3% per year (95% CI, 2.8%-6.0%). In the 156 patients with LGD, regression to no dysplasia occurred in 66%, persistent LGD in 21%, and progression to HGD/cancer in 13%. The incidence of cancer in patients with LGD was 1 in 156 patient-years of follow-up or 0.6% per year (95% CI, 0%-1.3%).
CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary results from this trial define the prevalence and incidence of dysplasia and cancer in a multicenter cohort of patients with BE. At least half the patients who developed HGD and/or cancer had 2 consecutive initial endoscopies with biopsies revealing nondysplastic mucosa. The majority of patients with LGD regressed and had a cancer incidence similar to all BE patients.
AD
University of Kansas School of Medicine&Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Kansas City, Missouri 64128-2295, USA. psharma@kumc.edu
PMID
17
TI
Risk of malignant progression in Barrett's esophagus patients: results from a large population-based study.
AU
Bhat S, Coleman HG, Yousef F, Johnston BT, McManus DT, Gavin AT, Murray LJ
SO
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2011;103(13):1049. Epub 2011 Jun 16.
 
BACKGROUND: Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a premalignant lesion that predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the reported incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in patients with BE varies widely. We examined the risk of malignant progression in patients with BE using data from the Northern Ireland Barrett's esophagus Register (NIBR), one of the largest population-based registries of BE worldwide, which includes every adult diagnosed with BE in Northern Ireland between 1993 and 2005.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We followed 8522 patients with BE, defined as columnar lined epithelium of the esophagus with or without specialized intestinal metaplasia (SIM), until the end of 2008. Patients with incident adenocarcinomas of the esophagus or gastric cardia or with high-grade dysplasia of the esophagus were identified by matching the NIBR with the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry, and deaths were identified by matching with records from the Registrar General's Office. Incidence of cancer outcomes or high-grade dysplasia was calculated as events per 100 person-years (% per year) of follow-up, and Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine incidence byage, sex, length of BE segment, presence of SIM, macroscopic BE, or low-grade dysplasia. All P values were from two-sided tests.
RESULTS: After a mean of 7.0 years of follow-up, 79 patients were diagnosed with esophageal cancer, 16 with cancer of the gastric cardia, and 36 with high-grade dysplasia. In the entire cohort, incidence of esophageal or gastric cardia cancer or high-grade dysplasia combined was 0.22% per year (95% confidence interval [CI]= 0.19% to 0.26%). SIM was found in 46.0% of patients. In patients with SIM, the combined incidence was 0.38% per year (95% CI = 0.31 to 0.46%). The risk of cancer was statistically significantly elevated in patients with vs without SIM at index biopsy (0.38% per year vs 0.07% per year; hazard ratio [HR]= 3.54, 95% CI = 2.09 to 6.00, P<.001), in men compared with women (0.28% per year vs 0.13% per year; HR = 2.11, 95% CI = 1.41 to 3.16, P<.001), and in patients with low-grade dysplasia compared with no dysplasia (1.40% per year vs 0.17% per year; HR = 5.67, 95% CI = 3.77 to 8.53, P<.001).
CONCLUSION: We found the risk of malignant progression among patients with BE to be lower than previously reported, suggesting that currently recommended surveillance strategies may not be cost-effective.
AD
Centre for Public Health, Queens University Belfast, Institute of Clinical Sciences Building, Belfast BT12 6BA, Northern Ireland, UK. shiv_bhat@doctors.org.uk
PMID
18
TI
Incidence of adenocarcinoma among patients with Barrett's esophagus.
AU
Hvid-Jensen F, Pedersen L, Drewes AM, Sørensen HT, Funch-Jensen P
SO
N Engl J Med. 2011;365(15):1375.
 
BACKGROUND: Accurate population-based data are needed on the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma and high-grade dysplasia among patients with Barrett's esophagus.
METHODS: We conducted a nationwide, population-based, cohort study involving all patients with Barrett's esophagus in Denmark during the period from 1992 through 2009, using data from the Danish Pathology Registry and the Danish Cancer Registry. We determined the incidence rates (numbers of cases per 1000 person-years) of adenocarcinoma and high-grade dysplasia. As a measure of relative risk, standardized incidence ratios were calculated with the use of national cancer rates in Denmark during the study period.
RESULTS: We identified 11,028 patients with Barrett's esophagus and analyzed their data for a median of 5.2 years. Within the first year after the index endoscopy, 131 new cases of adenocarcinoma were diagnosed. During subsequent years, 66 new adenocarcinomas were detected, yielding an incidence rate for adenocarcinoma of 1.2 cases per 1000 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.9 to 1.5). As compared with the risk in the general population, the relative risk of adenocarcinoma among patients with Barrett's esophagus was 11.3 (95% CI, 8.8 to 14.4). The annual risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma was 0.12% (95% CI, 0.09 to 0.15). Detection of low-grade dysplasia on the index endoscopy was associated with an incidence rate for adenocarcinoma of 5.1 cases per 1000 person-years. In contrast, the incidence rate among patients without dysplasia was 1.0 case per 1000 person-years. Risk estimates for patients with high-grade dysplasia were slightly higher.
CONCLUSIONS: Barrett's esophagus is a strong risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma, but the absolute annual risk, 0.12%, is much lower than the assumed risk of 0.5%, which is the basis for current surveillance guidelines. Data from the current study call into question the rationale for ongoing surveillance in patients who have Barrett's esophagus without dysplasia. (Funded by the Clinical Institute, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark.).
AD
Department of Surgical Gastroenterology L, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
PMID
19
TI
The incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma in non-dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus: a meta-analysis.
AU
Desai TK, Krishnan K, Samala N, Singh J, Cluley J, Perla S, Howden CW
SO
Gut. 2012;61(7):970. Epub 2011 Oct 13.
 
INTRODUCTION: The risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) in non-dysplastic Barrett's oesophagus (BO) may have been overestimated. The objective was to estimate the incidence of OAC in patients with BO without dysplasia.
METHODS: The authors searched MEDLINE and EMBASE from 1966 to 2011 and performed a bibliographic review of previous publications, excluding abstracts, non-peer-reviewed publications and those not published in English, for prospective or retrospective studies of the incidence of OAC in patients with BO. They excluded patients with any degree of dysplasia at baseline and those without documented intestinal metaplasia. Studies were independently reviewed by two individuals. 57 of 3450 studies were included. The authors extracted information on number of patients with BO, length of follow-up, incident cases of OAC, mean age of patients, country of origin, whether prospective or retrospective, mean length of BO segments and mortality from causes other than OAC. Study quality was assessed by the Ottawa Newcastle criteria.
RESULTS: The 57 included studies comprised 11,434 patients and 58,547 patient-years of follow-up. The pooled annual incidence of OAC was 0.33% (95% CI 0.28% to 0.38%). Among 16 studies that provided appropriate information on mortality, there were 56 incident cases of OAC but 684 deaths from apparently unrelated causes. Among 16 studies that provided information on patients with short-segment BO, the annual incidence of OAC was only 0.19%.
CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of OAC in non-dysplastic BO is around 1 per 300 patients per year. The incidence of OAC in short-segment BO is under 1 per 500 patients per year.
AD
Department of internal medicine, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan, USA. tusardesai@aol.com
PMID
20
TI
Re: Risk of malignant progression in Barrett's esophagus patients: results from a large population-based study.
AU
Rugge M, Fassan M, Cavallin F, Zaninotto G
SO
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2012;104(22):1771.
 
AD
PMID
21
TI
The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a national veterans cohort with Barrett's esophagus.
AU
Shakhatreh MH, Duan Z, Kramer J, Naik AD, Helm A, Hinojosa-Lindsey M, Chen GJ, El-Serag HB
SO
Am J Gastroenterol. 2014;109(12):1862. Epub 2014 Oct 21.
 
OBJECTIVES: The increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) in the United States may have leveled off in recent years. The risk of EA among patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) seems to be decreasing in several European cohorts, but these estimates are unknown in the United States. We aimed to determine the risk of developing EA in a national cohort of BE patients in the US Veterans Health Administration and to account for the use of endoscopic ablation and esophagectomy.
METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study from a total of 121 facilities in the Veterans Health Administration. Veteran patients with BE diagnosed between 1 October 2003 and 30 September 2009 were included and followed until esophageal cancer diagnosis, death or 30 September 2011. All EA diagnoses were verified in detailed structured reviews of medical records.
RESULTS: We identified 29,536 patientswith BE who met our eligibility criteria. Most were men (96.9%) and White (83.2%), with a mean age of 61.8 years. During 144,949 person-years of follow-up, 466 patients developed EA, yielding an incidence rate of 3.21 per 1,000 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.94-3.52). Excluding those who developed EA within 1 year of their index BE date lowered the incidence rate to 1.75 per 1,000 person-years. However, including additional patients who underwent endoscopic ablation or esophagectomy for HGD or EA increased the incidence rate to 4.79 (95% CI 4.44-5.16).
CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of EA in a US national cohort of mostly male veterans may be lower than previous estimates. Almost half of the EA cases were diagnosed within 1 year of their BE index date.
AD
1]Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness, and Safety, Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, Texas, USA [2]Sections of Health Services Research, and Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.
PMID
22
TI
Adenocarcinoma in Barrett's oesophagus: an overrated risk.
AU
Van der Veen AH, Dees J, Blankensteijn JD, Van Blankenstein M
SO
Gut. 1989;30(1):14.
 
Barrett's oesophagus is a risk factor for the development of oesophageal cancer and for this reason annual endoscopic surveillance has been proposed. In this retrospective study of all patients with Barrett's oesophagus diagnosed in a 12 year period carcinoma had developed in only four patients. The incidence of oesophageal cancer in this series was one in 170 patient years, which means a 30-fold increase compared with the general population. The survival of patients with Barrett's oesophagus was not different, however, from an age and sex matched control population. It is concluded that systematic endoscopic surveillance of patients with Barrett's oesophagus is not indicated.
AD
Department of Internal Medicine II, University Hospital Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
PMID
23
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Risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma and mortality in patients with Barrett's esophagus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
AU
Sikkema M, de Jonge PJ, Steyerberg EW, Kuipers EJ
SO
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010;8(3):235.
 
BACKGROUND&#38; AIMS: As the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and mortality in patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) are important determinants of the potential yield and cost-effectiveness of BE surveillance, clarification of these factors is essential. We therefore performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the incidence of EAC and mortality due to EAC in BE under surveillance.
METHODS: Databases were searched for relevant cohort studies in English language that reported EAC risk and mortality due to EAC in BE. Studies had to include patients with histologically proven BE, documented follow-up, and histologically proven EAC on surveillance. A random effects model was used with assessment of heterogeneity by the I(2)-statistic and of publication bias by Begg's and Egger's tests.
RESULTS: Fifty-one studies were included in the main analysis. The overall mean age of BE patients was 61 years; the mean overall proportion of males was 64%. The pooled estimate for EAC incidence was 6.3/1000 person-years of follow-up (95% confidence interval, 4.7-8.4) with considerable heterogeneity (P<.001; I(2) = 79%). Nineteen studies reported data on mortality due to EAC. The pooled incidence of fatal EAC was 3.0/1000 person-years of follow-up (95% confidence interval, 2.2-3.9) with no evidence for heterogeneity (P = .4; I(2) = 7%). No evidence of publication bias was found.
CONCLUSIONS: Patients with BE are at low risk of malignant progression and predominantly die due to causes other than EAC. This undermines the cost-effectiveness of BE surveillance and supports the search for valid risk stratification tools to identify the minority of patients that are likely to benefit from surveillance.
AD
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus MC-University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. m.sikkema@erasmusmc.nl
PMID
24
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The incidence of esophageal cancer and high-grade dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
AU
Yousef F, Cardwell C, Cantwell MM, Galway K, Johnston BT, Murray L
SO
Am J Epidemiol. 2008;168(3):237. Epub 2008 Jun 12.
 
Barrett's esophagus is a well-recognized precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Surveillance of Barrett's esophagus patients is recommended to detect high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or early cancer. Because of wide variation in the published cancer incidence in Barrett's esophagus, the authors undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of cancer and HGD incidence in Barrett's esophagus. Ovid Medline (Ovid Technologies, Inc., New York, New York) and EMBASE (Elsevier, Amsterdam, the Netherlands) databases were searched for papers published between 1950 and 2006 that reported the cancer/HGD risk in Barrett's esophagus. Where possible, early incident cancers/HGD were excluded, as were patients with HGD at baseline. Forty-seven studies were included in the main analysis, and the pooled estimate for cancer incidence in Barrett's esophagus was 6.1/1,000 person-years, 5.3/1,000 person-years when early incident cancers were excluded, and 4.1/1,000 person-years when both early incident cancer and HGD at baseline were excluded. Corresponding figures for combined HGD/cancer incidence were 10.0 person-years, 9.3 person-years, and 9.1/1,000 person-years. Compared with women, men progressed to cancer at twice the rate. Cancer or HGD/cancer incidences werelower when only high-quality studies were analyzed (3.9/1,000 person-years and 7.7/1,000 person-years, respectively). The pooled estimates of cancer and HGD incidence were low, suggesting that the cost-effectiveness of surveillance is questionable unless it can be targeted to those with the highest cancer risk.
AD
Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Research Group, Centre for Clinical and Population Sciences, Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom. Fyousef01@qub.ac.uk
PMID
25
TI
Risk of malignant progression in patients with Barrett's oesophagus: a Dutch nationwide cohort study.
AU
de Jonge PJ, van Blankenstein M, Looman CW, Casparie MK, Meijer GA, Kuipers EJ
SO
Gut. 2010;59(8):1030.
 
BACKGROUND: Reported incidence rates of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) in Barrett's oesophagus (BO) vary widely. As the effectiveness of BO surveillance is crucially dependent on this rate, its clarification is essential.
METHODS: To estimate the rate of malignant progression in patients with BO, all patients with a first diagnosis of BO with no dysplasia (ND) or low-grade dysplasia (LGD) between 1991 and 2006 were identified in the Dutch nationwide registry of histopathology (PALGA). Follow-up data were evaluated up to November 2007.
RESULTS: 42 207 patients with BO were included; 4132 (8%) of them had LGD. Re-evaluation endoscopies at least 6 months after initial diagnosis were performed in 16 365 patients (39%), who were significantly younger than those not re-examined (58+/-13 vs 63+/-16 years, p<0.001). These patients were followed-up for a total of 78 131 person-years, during which 666 (4%) high-grade dysplasia (HGD)/OACs occurred, affecting 4% of the surveillance patient population (mean age: 69+/-12 years, 76% male). After excluding HGD/OAC cases detected within 1 year after BO diagnosis (n=212, 32%), incidence rates per 1000 person-years were 4.3 (95% CI 3.4 to 5.5) for OAC and 5.8 (95% CI 4.6 to 7.0) for HGD/OAC combined. Risk factors for HGD/OAC were increased age (eg,>75 years HR 12; 95% CI 8.0 to 18), male sex (2.01; 1.68 to 2.60) and presence of LGD at baseline (1.91; 1.53 to 2.40).
CONCLUSION: In this largest reported cohort of unselected patients with BO, the annual risk of OAC was 0.4%. Male sex, older age and LGD at diagnosis are independent predictors of malignant progression, and should enable an improved risk assessment in BO.
AD
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands. p.dejonge@erasmusmc.nl
PMID
26
TI
Patients with nondysplastic Barrett's esophagus have low risks for developing dysplasia or esophageal adenocarcinoma.
AU
Wani S, Falk G, Hall M, Gaddam S, Wang A, Gupta N, Singh M, Singh V, Chuang KY, Boolchand V, Gavini H, Kuczynski J, Sud P, Reddymasu S, Bansal A, Rastogi A, Mathur SC, Young P, Cash B, Lieberman DA, Sampliner RE, Sharma P
SO
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2011;9(3):220.
 
BACKGROUND&#38; AIMS: The risks of dysplasia and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) are not clear for patients with nondysplastic Barrett's esophagus (NDBE); the rate of progression has been overestimated in previous studies. We studied the incidences of dysplasia and EAC and investigated factors associated with progression of BE.
METHODS: The BE study is a multicenter outcomes project of a large cohort of patients with BE. Neoplasia was graded as low-grade dysplasia, high-grade dysplasia (HGD), or EAC. Patients followed up for at least 1 year after the index endoscopy examination were included, whereas those diagnosed with dysplasia and EAC within 1 year of diagnosis with BE (prevalent cases) were excluded. Of 3334 patients with BE, 1204 met the inclusion criteria (93.7% Caucasian; 88% male; mean age, 59.3 y) and were followed up for a mean of 5.52 years (6644.5 patient-years).
RESULTS: Eighteen patients developed EAC (incidence, 0.27%/y; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.17-0.43) and 32 developed HGD (incidence, 0.48%/y; 95% CI, 0.34-0.68). The incidence of HGD and EAC was 0.63%/y (95% CI, 0.47-0.86). There were 217 cases of low-grade dysplasia (incidence, 3.6%/y; 95% CI, 3.2-4.1). Five and 10 years after diagnosis, 98.6% (n = 540) and 97.1% (n = 155) of patients with NDBE were cancer free, respectively. The length of the BE was associated significantly with progression (EAC<6 cm, 0.09%/y vs EAC≥6 cm, 0.65%/y; P = 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: There is a lower incidence of dysplasia and EAC among patients with NDBE than previously reported. Because most patients are cancer free after a long-term follow-up period, surveillance intervals might be lengthened, especially for patients with shorter segments of BE.
AD
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, Missouri, USA.
PMID