Medline ® Abstracts for References 40-43

of 'Bacterial vaginosis'

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Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines, 2010.
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Workowski KA, Berman S, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
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MMWR Recomm Rep. 2010;59(RR-12):1.
 
These guidelines for the treatment of persons who have or are at risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) were updated by CDC after consultation with a group of professionals knowledgeable in the field of STDs who met in Atlanta on April 18-30, 2009. The information in this report updates the 2006 Guidelines for Treatment of Sexually Transmitted Diseases (MMWR 2006;55[No. RR-11]). Included in these updated guidelines is new information regarding 1) the expanded diagnostic evaluation for cervicitis and trichomoniasis; 2) new treatment recommendations for bacterial vaginosis and genital warts; 3) the clinical efficacy of azithromycin for chlamydial infections in pregnancy; 4) the role of Mycoplasma genitalium and trichomoniasis in urethritis/cervicitis and treatment-related implications; 5) lymphogranuloma venereum proctocolitis among men who have sex with men; 6) the criteria for spinal fluid examination to evaluate for neurosyphilis; 7) the emergence of azithromycin-resistant Treponema pallidum; 8) the increasing prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae; 9) the sexual transmission of hepatitis C; 10) diagnostic evaluation after sexual assault; and 11) STD prevention approaches.
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Division of STD Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. kgw2@cdc.gov
PMID
41
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European (IUSTI/WHO) guideline on the management of vaginal discharge, 2011.
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Sherrard J, Donders G, White D, Jensen JS, European IUSTI
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Int J STD AIDS. 2011 Aug;22(8):421-9.
 
Three common infections are associated with vaginal discharge: bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis and candidiasis, of which trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted infection (STI). This guideline covers the presentation and clinical findings of these infections and outlines the differential diagnoses. Recommendations for investigation and management based on currently available evidence are made, including the management of persistent and recurrent infections.
AD
Department of Genitourinary Medicine, Churchill Hospital, Oxford, UK. jackiesherrard@doctors.org.uk
PMID
42
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Diagnosis and clinical manifestations of bacterial vaginosis.
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Eschenbach DA, Hillier S, Critchlow C, Stevens C, DeRouen T, Holmes KK
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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1988;158(4):819.
 
Among 640 randomly selected women who were attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic and did not have trichomoniasis, 33% had bacterial vaginosis as defined by a composite of four clinical criteria: (1) Vaginal discharge was homogeneous; (2) vaginal discharge had a pH greater than or equal to 4.7; (3) vaginal discharge had an amine-like odor when mixed with 10% potassium hydroxide; (4) vaginal discharge contained clue cells representing greater than or equal to 20% of vaginal epithelial cells. Previously published Gram stain criteria for bacterial vaginosis correlated better than results of semiquantitative cultures for Gardnerella vaginalis with presence or absence of clue cells and with composite clinical criteria. Of 293 women with bacterial vaginosis by Gram stain criteria, 65% had symptoms of increased vaginal discharge and/or vaginal malodor, while 74% had signs of characteristic homogeneous vaginal discharge or amine-like odor. Elevated vaginal pH was the least specific and amine-like odor the least sensitive sign of bacterial vaginosis. Gram stain criteria for bacterial vaginosis were not associated with the concentrations of endocervical or vaginal inflammatory cells but were significantly associated with a clinical diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease. After adjusting for coinfection, sexual behavior, and other variables, bacterial vaginosis remained associated with adnexal tenderness (odds ratio =9.2, p = 0.04). Bacterial vaginosis, previously implicated as a risk factor for obstetric infections, may be a risk factor for pelvic inflammatory disease.
AD
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195.
PMID
43
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Predictive value of the clinical diagnosis of lower genital tract infection in women.
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Landers DV, Wiesenfeld HC, Heine RP, Krohn MA, Hillier SL
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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2004;190(4):1004.
 
OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that diagnostic approaches to lower genital tract infections are inaccurate and proposed this study to evaluate typical approaches.
STUDY DESIGN: Clinical diagnoses were made with symptoms, direct observation, wet mount, vaginal pH, and amines in 598 women with genital complaints. Laboratory testing for N gonorrhoeae, yeast, T vaginalis, C trachomatis, and bacterial vaginosis by Gram stain.
RESULTS: The most frequent symptoms were vaginal discharge (64%), change in discharge (53%), malodor (48%), and pruritus (32%). The infection rates were 46% bacterial vaginosis, 29% yeast, 12% trichomoniasis, 11% chlamydia or gonorrhea; 21% of the patients had no infection. The symptoms did not predict laboratory diagnosis. Clinical signs and symptoms with office-based tests and microscopy improved the accuracy of diagnoses. Amsel's clinical diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis was the most sensitive at 92%. The sensitivity of wet mount diagnosis of trichomoniasis was 62%, of yeast by microscopy was 22%, and of mucopus for theprediction of gonorrhea and/or chlamydia was 30%.
CONCLUSION: Symptoms alone should not be used to direct treatment in instances in which resources permit more complete evaluation with office-based testing that includes microscopy. Treatment failures or diagnostic uncertainty should prompt specific laboratory testing.
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Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh and Magee-Women's Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. lande028@umn.edu
PMID