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Bacterial vaginosis: Clinical manifestations and diagnosis

Author
Jack D Sobel, MD
Section Editor
Robert L Barbieri, MD
Deputy Editor
Kristen Eckler, MD, FACOG

INTRODUCTION

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a clinical condition characterized by a shift in vaginal flora away from Lactobacillus species toward more diverse bacterial species, including facultative anaerobes. The altered microbiome causes a rise in vaginal pH and symptoms that range from none to very bothersome. Future health implications of BV include, but are not limited to, increased susceptibility to other sexually transmitted infections and preterm birth.

This topic will discuss the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and treatment of BV. Related topics on the treatment of BV, evaluation of vaginitis, and cervicitis are presented separately.

(See "Bacterial vaginosis: Treatment".)

(See "Approach to women with symptoms of vaginitis".)

(See "Acute cervicitis".)

                  

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Literature review current through: May 2017. | This topic last updated: Jun 14, 2017.
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