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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 96

of 'Anterior cruciate ligament injury'

96
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Management of anterior cruciate ligament rupture in patients aged 40 years and older.
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Legnani C, Terzaghi C, Borgo E, Ventura A
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J Orthop Traumatol. 2011;12(4):177. Epub 2011 Nov 11.
 
The aim of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is essentially to restore functional stability of the knee and to allow patients to return to their desired work and activities. While in the young and active population, surgery is often the best therapeutic option after an ACL tear, ACL reconstruction in middle-aged people is rather more controversial due to concerns about a higher complication rate. The purpose of our article is to establish, through a systematic review of the literature, useful decision-making criteria for the management of anterior cruciate ligament rupture in patients aged 40 years and older, guiding surgeons to the most appropriate therapeutic approach. Various reports have shown excellent results of ACL reconstruction in patients over the age of 40 in terms of subjective satisfaction, return to previous activity level, and reduced complication and failure rates. Some even document excellent outcomes in subjects of 50 years and older. Although there are limited high-level studies, data reported in the literature suggest that ACL reconstruction can be successful in appropriately selected, motivated older patients with symptomatic knee instability who want to return to participating in highly demanding sport and recreational activities. Deciding factors are based on occupation, sex, activity level of the subject, amount of time spent performing such highly demanding activities, and presence of associated knee lesions. Physiological age and activity level are more important than chronological age as deciding factors when considering ACL reconstruction.
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Scuola di Specializzazione in Ortopedia e Traumatologia, Universitàdegli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. clegnan@alice.it
PMID