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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 189

of 'Anterior cruciate ligament injury'

189
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Knee valgus during drop jumps in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I female athletes: the effect of a medial post.
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Joseph M, Tiberio D, Baird JL, Trojian TH, Anderson JM, Kraemer WJ, Maresh CM
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Am J Sports Med. 2008;36(2):285. Epub 2007 Oct 31.
 
BACKGROUND: Female athletes land from a jump with greater knee valgus and ankle pronation/eversion. Excessive valgus and pronation have been linked to risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury. A medially posted orthosis decreases component motions of knee valgus such as foot pronation/eversion and tibial internal rotation.
HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesized a medial post would decrease knee valgus and ankle pronation/eversion during drop-jump landings in NCAA-I female athletes.
STUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory study.
METHODS: Knee and ankle 3-dimensional kinematics were measured using high-speed motion capture in 10 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I female athletes during a drop-jump landing with and without a medial post. Analysis of variance was used to determine differences in posting condition, t tests were used to determine dominant-nondominant differences, and the Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine relationships between variables.
RESULTS: Significant differences were found for all measures in the posted condition. A medial post decreased knee valgus at initial contact (1.24 degrees , P<.01) and maximum angle (1.21 degrees , P<.01). The post also decreased ankle pronation/eversion at initial contact (0.77 degrees , P<.01) and maximum angle (0.95 degrees , P = .039).
CONCLUSION: The authors have demonstrated a significant decrease in knee valgus and ankle pronation/eversion during a drop jump with a medial post placed in the athletes' shoes.
CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A medial post may be a potential means to decrease risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury.
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Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA. mickpt@sbcglobal.net
PMID