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Medline ® Abstracts for References 49,50,54

of 'Anaphylaxis: Emergency treatment'

49
TI
Allergic reactions in the community: a questionnaire survey of members of the anaphylaxis campaign.
AU
Uguz A, Lack G, Pumphrey R, Ewan P, Warner J, Dick J, Briggs D, Clarke S, Reading D, Hourihane J
SO
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005;35(6):746.
 
BACKGROUND: Allergic reactions to food are well recognized in both children and adults, but because of their relative infrequency their typical features may not be readily recognized by patients and their medical care givers who are not allergists.
OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate the circumstances and clinical characteristics of food allergies in adults and children in the community.
METHODS: Self-completed questionnaire responses over a 6-month period from 109 members of the Anaphylaxis Campaign, the major British patient resource group for people who have suffered severe allergic reactions.
RESULTS: One hundred and nine respondents reported 126 reactions during the study period. Seventy-five were children (under 16 years, median age 6 years at the time of reaction). Predictably more boys than girls were reported to have had reactions but more women reported reactions than men (P<0.05). Although the groups were equally aware of their food allergies the children had undergone diagnostic testsmore often (P<0.001). Foods were implicated in 112 (89%) of reports. Restaurants were implicated less often (14%) than in other series, probably reflecting British eating habits. Children with asthma reported more severe reactions than those without asthma (P=0.008), although frequency or severity of recent asthma symptoms was not associated with severity of allergic reaction reported. When available, self-injectable adrenaline was used in 35% of severe reactions and 13% of non-severe reactions (P=0.01). A quarter of adults who received one dose of adrenaline also received a second dose.
CONCLUSION: The allergens implicated in this report reflect previous data from similar patient groups in North America. Asthmatic children suffer more severe reactions than non-asthmatic children. It appears that British adults need better access to expert care of their allergies. Even when it is prescribed and available self-injectable adrenaline appears under-used in severe reactions. The incidence of severe but non-fatal allergic reactions in the UK may have been underestimated in the past.
AD
University of Southampton, UK.
PMID
50
TI
Use of multiple doses of epinephrine in food-induced anaphylaxis in children.
AU
Järvinen KM, Sicherer SH, Sampson HA, Nowak-Wegrzyn A
SO
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2008;122(1):133. Epub 2008 Jun 10.
 
BACKGROUND: Food allergy is the most common cause of anaphylaxis outside the hospital setting.
OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the rate, circumstances, and risk factors for repeated doses of epinephrine in the treatment of food-induced anaphylaxis in children.
METHODS: Anonymous questionnaires were distributed to families of children with food allergies during allergy outpatient visits to a food allergy referral center. Demographic information, allergy and reaction history, and details regarding the last 2 anaphylactic reactions requiring epinephrine were collected.
RESULTS: A total of 413 questionnaires were analyzed. Seventy-eight children (median, 4.5 years of age; range, 0.5-17.5 years) reported 95 reactions for which epinephrine was administered. Two doses were administered in 12 (13%) and 3 doses in an additional 6 (6%) reactions treated with epinephrine. Peanut, tree nuts, and cow's milk were responsible for>75% of reactions requiring epinephrine. Patients receiving multiple doses of epinephrine more often had asthma (P = .027) than children receiving a single dose. The amount of food ingested or a delay in the initial administration of epinephrine were not risk factors for receiving multiple doses. The second dose of epinephrine was administered by a health care professional in 94% of reactions.
CONCLUSION: In this referral population of children and adolescents with multiple food allergies, 19% of food-induced anaphylactic reactions were treated with more than 1 dose of epinephrine. Prospective studies are necessary to identify risk factors for severe anaphylaxis and to establish rational guidelines for prescribing multiple epinephrine autoinjectors for children with food allergy.
AD
Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology and Jaffe Institute for Food Allergy, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029-6574, USA. kirsi.jarvinen@mssm.edu
PMID
54
TI
Multicenter study of repeat epinephrine treatments for food-related anaphylaxis.
AU
Rudders SA, Banerji A, Corel B, Clark S, Camargo CA Jr
SO
Pediatrics. 2010;125(4):e711. Epub 2010 Mar 22.
 
OBJECTIVE: We sought to establish the frequency of receiving>1 dose of epinephrine in children who present to the emergency department (ED) with food-related anaphylaxis.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a medical chart review at Boston hospitals of all children presenting to the ED for food-related acute allergic reactions between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2006. We focused on causative foods, clinical presentations, and emergency treatments.
RESULTS: Through random sampling and appropriate weighting, the 605 reviewed cases represented a study cohort of 1255 patients. These patients had a median age of 5.8 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.3-6.3), and the cohort was 62% male. A variety of foods provoked the allergic reactions, including peanuts (23%), tree nuts (18%), and milk (15%). Approximately half (52% [95% CI: 48-57]) of the children met diagnostic criteria for food-related anaphylaxis. Among those with anaphylaxis, 31% received 1 dose and 3% received>1 dose of epinephrine before their arrival to the ED. In the ED, patients with anaphylaxis received antihistamines (59%), corticosteroids (57%), epinephrine (20%). Over the course of their reaction, 44% of patients with food-related anaphylaxis received epinephrine, and among this subset of patients, 12% (95% CI: 9-14) received>1 dose. Risk factors for repeat epinephrine use included older age and transfer from an outside hospital. Most patients (88%) were discharged from the hospital. On ED discharge, 43% were prescribed self-injectable epinephrine, and only 22% were referred to an allergist.
CONCLUSIONS: Among children with food-related anaphylaxis who received epinephrine, 12% received a second dose. Results of this study support the recommendation that children at risk for food-related anaphylaxis carry 2 doses of epinephrine.
AD
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
PMID