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Medline ® Abstracts for References 14,15,18,43

of 'Anaphylaxis: Emergency treatment'

14
TI
Adrenaline in the treatment of anaphylaxis: what is the evidence?
AU
McLean-Tooke AP, Bethune CA, Fay AC, Spickett GP
SO
BMJ. 2003;327(7427):1332.
 
AD
Regional Department of Immunology and Allergy, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 4LP. andrew.mclean-tooke@nuth.northy.nhs.uk
PMID
15
TI
Pharmacologic treatment of anaphylaxis: can the evidence base be strengthened?
AU
Simons FE
SO
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010;10(4):384.
 
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To evaluate the evidence base for the pharmacologic treatment of anaphylaxis.
RECENT FINDINGS: In this review, we focus on four classes of medications (the alpha/beta-agonist epinephrine (adrenaline), H1-antihistamines, H2-antihistamines, and glucocorticoids) that are used in healthcare settings for the initial treatment of anaphylaxis. Epinephrine and many H1-antihistamines and glucocorticoids were introduced before the era of randomized controlled trials and before the era of evidence-based medicine. In anaphylaxis, no randomized controlled trials that are free from methodological problems and meet current standards have been performed with these medications, or with H2-antihistamines. The evidence base for epinephrine injection is stronger than the evidence base for use of other medications in anaphylaxis. Guidelines unanimously recommend prompt injection of epinephrine as the life-saving first-line medication in anaphylaxis; however, they differ in their recommendations for H1-antihistamines, H2-antihistamines, and glucocorticoids. Epinephrine is the only medication that is universally available for anaphylaxis treatment in healthcare settings worldwide. Paradoxically, it is underused in anaphylaxis treatment.
SUMMARY: For ethical reasons, there should never be a placebo-controlled trial of epinephrine in anaphylaxis. We discuss why the possibility of conducting randomized placebo-controlled trials with H1-antihistamines, H2-antihistamines, and particularly with glucocorticoids in anaphylaxis should be considered in order to improve the evidence base for treatment and guide clinical decision-making. We also describe the precautions that will be needed if randomized controlled trials are conducted in anaphylaxis.
AD
Department of Pediatrics&Child Health, Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. lmcniven@hsc.mb.ca
PMID
18
TI
First-aid treatment of anaphylaxis to food: focus on epinephrine.
AU
Simons FE
SO
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004;113(5):837.
 
Avoiding food triggers for anaphylactic reactions (severe acute systemic allergic reactions) is easier said than done. Most episodes of anaphylaxis to food occur unexpectedly in the community in the absence of a health care professional. All individuals at risk should therefore have an emergency action plan in place. The cornerstone of first-aid treatment of anaphylaxis is epinephrine injected intramuscularly in the vastus lateralis muscle (lateral aspect of the thigh). In this review, we focus on epinephrine. We examine a therapeutic dilemma: the issue of epinephrine dose selection in an individual for whom no optimal fixed-dose auto-injector formulation exists, and a therapeutic controversy: the issue of epinephrine injection versus an oral H1-antihistamine in anaphylaxis episodes that appear to be mild. The pharmaceutical industry could address the first of these issues by providing a wider range of epinephrine fixed doses in easy-to-use auto-injectors, or by providing adjustable epinephrine doses in auto-injectors. The second issue could be addressed in part by development of alternative routes of epinephrine administration for the first-aid, out-of-hospital treatment of anaphylaxis.
AD
Section of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3A 1R9. lmcniven@hsc.mb.ca
PMID
43
TI
Epinephrine: the drug of choice for anaphylaxis. A statement of the World Allergy Organization.
AU
Kemp SF, Lockey RF, Simons FE, World Allergy Organization ad hoc Committee on Epinephrine in Anaphylaxis
SO
Allergy. 2008;63(8):1061.
 
Anaphylaxis is an acute and potentially lethal multi-system allergic reaction. Most consensus guidelines for the past 30 years have held that epinephrine is the drug of choice and the first drug that should be administered in acute anaphylaxis. Some state that properly administered epinephrine has no absolute contraindication in this clinical setting. A committee of anaphylaxis experts assembled by the World Allergy Organization has examined the evidence from the medical literature concerning the appropriate use of epinephrine for anaphylaxis. The Committee strongly believes that epinephrine is currently underutilized and often dosed suboptimally to treat anaphylaxis, is under-prescribed for potential future self-administration, that most of the reasons proposed to withhold its clinical use are flawed, and that the therapeutic benefits of epinephrine exceed the risk when given in appropriate i.m. doses.
AD
Department of Medicine, The University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA.
PMID