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Medline ® Abstracts for References 11,22,23,26,77

of 'Anaphylaxis: Emergency treatment'

11
TI
H1-antihistamines for the treatment of anaphylaxis: Cochrane systematic review.
AU
Sheikh A, Ten Broek V, Brown SG, Simons FE
SO
Allergy. 2007;62(8):830.
 
BACKGROUND: Anaphylaxis is an acute systemic allergic reaction, which can be life-threatening. H(1)-antihistamines are commonly used as an adjuvant therapy in the treatment of anaphylaxis. We sought to assess the benefits and harm of H(1)-antihistamines in the treatment of anaphylaxis.
METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library); MEDLINE (1966 to June 2006); EMBASE (1966 to June 2006); CINAHL (1982 to June 2006) and ISI Web of Science (1945 to July 2006). We also contacted pharmaceutical companies and international experts in anaphylaxis in an attempt to locate unpublished material. Randomized and quasi-randomized-controlled trials comparing H(1)-antihistamines with placebo or no intervention were eligible for inclusion. Two authors independently assessed articles for inclusion.
RESULTS: We found no studies that satisfied the inclusion criteria.
CONCLUSIONS: Based on this review, we are unable to make any recommendations for clinical practice. Randomized-controlled trials are needed, although these are likely to prove challenging to design and execute.
AD
Division of Community Health Sciences: GP Section, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
PMID
22
TI
Anaphylaxis--a practice parameter update 2015.
AU
Lieberman P, Nicklas RA, Randolph C, Oppenheimer J, Bernstein D, Bernstein J, Ellis A, Golden DB, Greenberger P, Kemp S, Khan D, Ledford D, Lieberman J, Metcalfe D, Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Sicherer S, Wallace D, Blessing-Moore J, Lang D, Portnoy JM, Schuller D, Spector S, Tilles SA
SO
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2015;115(5):341.
 
AD
PMID
23
TI
World Allergy Organization anaphylaxis guidelines: summary.
AU
Simons FE, Ardusso LR, BilòMB, El-Gamal YM, Ledford DK, Ring J, Sanchez-Borges M, Senna GE, Sheikh A, Thong BY, World Allergy Organization
SO
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011;127(3):587.
 
AD
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. lmcniven@hsc.mb.ca
PMID
26
TI
The management of anaphylaxis in childhood: position paper of the European academy of allergology and clinical immunology.
AU
Muraro A, Roberts G, Clark A, Eigenmann PA, Halken S, Lack G, Moneret-Vautrin A, Niggemann B, RancéF, EAACI Task Force on Anaphylaxis in Children
SO
Allergy. 2007;62(8):857. Epub 2007 Jun 21.
 
Anaphylaxis is a growing paediatric clinical emergency that is difficult to diagnose because a consensus definition was lacking until recently. Many European countries have no specific guidelines for anaphylaxis. This position paper prepared by the EAACI Taskforce on Anaphylaxis in Children aims to provide practical guidelines for managing anaphylaxis in childhood based on the limited evidence available. Intramuscular adrenaline is the acknowledged first-line therapy for anaphylaxis, in hospital and in the community, and should be given as soon as the condition is recognized. Additional therapies such as volume support, nebulized bronchodilators, antihistamines or corticosteroids are supplementary to adrenaline. There are no absolute contraindications to administering adrenaline in children. Allergy assessment is mandatory in all children with a history of anaphylaxis because it is essential to identify and avoid the allergen to prevent its recurrence. A tailored anaphylaxis management plan is needed, based on an individual risk assessment, which is influenced by the child's previous allergic reactions, other medical conditions and social circumstances. Collaborative partnerships should be established, involving school staff, healthcare professionals and patients' organizations. Absolute indications for prescribing self-injectable adrenaline are prior cardiorespiratory reactions, exercise-induced anaphylaxis, idiopathic anaphylaxis and persistent asthma with food allergy. Relative indications include peanut or tree nut allergy, reactions to small quantities of a given food, food allergy in teenagers and living far away from a medical facility. The creation of national and European databases is expected to generate better-quality data and help develop a stepwise approach for a better management of paediatric anaphylaxis.
AD
Centre for Food Allergy Diagnosis and Treatment Veneto Region, Department of Pediatrics, University of Padua, Padua, Italy.
PMID
77
TI
Histamine and H1-antihistamines: celebrating a century of progress.
AU
Simons FE, Simons KJ
SO
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011;128(6):1139.
 
In this review we celebrate a century of progress since the initial description of the physiologic and pathologic roles of histamine and 70 years of progress since the introduction of H(1)-antihistamines for clinical use. We discuss histamine and clinically relevant information about the molecular mechanisms of action of H(1)-antihistamines as inverse agonists (not antagonists or blockers) with immunoregulatory effects. Unlike first (old)-generation H(1)-antihistamines introduced from 1942 to the mid-1980s, most of the second (new)-generation H(1)-antihistamines introduced subsequently have been investigated extensively with regard to clinical pharmacology, efficacy, and safety; moreover, they are relatively free from adverse effects and not causally linked with fatalities after overdose. Important advances include improved nasal and ophthalmic H(1)-antihistamines with rapid onset of action (in minutes) for allergic rhinitis and allergic conjunctivitis treatment, respectively, and effective and safe use of high (up to 4-fold) doses of oral second-generation H(1)-antihistamines for chronic urticaria treatment. New H(1)-antihistamines introduced for clinical use include oral formulations (bilastine and rupatadine), and ophthalmic formulations (alcaftadine and bepotastine). Clinical studies of H(3)-antihistamines with enhanced decongestant effects have been conducted in patients with allergic rhinitis. Additional novel compounds being studied include H(4)-antihistamines with anti-inflammatory effects in allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and other diseases. Antihistamines have a storied past and a promising future.
AD
Department of Pediatrics&Child Health and the Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. lmcniven@hsc.mb.ca
PMID