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Medline ® Abstracts for References 6,7

of 'Advance care planning and advance directives'

6
TI
Patients' and families' preferences for medical intensive care.
AU
Danis M, Patrick DL, Southerland LI, Green ML
SO
JAMA. 1988;260(6):797.
 
Medical ethics suggest that life-sustaining treatment decisions should be made with consideration for patients' preferences and quality of life. Patients were interviewed who were at least 55 years old and had experienced medical intensive care at a university hospital during a one-year period to determine their preferences regarding intensive care; family members were interviewed if the patient had died (n = 160). Seventy percent of patients and families were 100% willing to undergo intensive care again to achieve even one month of survival; 8% were completely unwilling to undergo intensive care to achieve any prolongation of survival. Preferences were poorly correlated with functional status or quality of life and were not altered by life expectancy for 82% of respondents. Age, severity of critical illness, length of stay, and charges for intensive care did not influence willingness to undergo intensive care. These data suggest that personal preferences may conflict with any health policy that limits the allocation of intensive care based on age, function, or quality of life.
AD
Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27514.
PMID
7
TI
Life-sustaining treatments during terminal illness: who wants what?
AU
Garrett JM, Harris RP, Norburn JK, Patrick DL, Danis M
SO
J Gen Intern Med. 1993 Jul;8(7):361-8.
 
OBJECTIVE: To determine patient characteristics associated with the desire for life-sustaining treatments in the event of terminal illness.
DESIGN: In-person survey from October 1986 to June 1988.
SETTING: 13 internal medicine and family practices in North Carolina.
PATIENTS: 2,536 patients (46% of those eligible) aged 65 years and older who were continuing care patients of participating practices, enrolled in Medicare. The patients were slightly older than the 65+ general population, 61% female, and 69% white, and most had one or more chronic illnesses.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The authors asked the patients whether they would want each of six different treatments (hospitalization, intensive care, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, surgery, artificial ventilation, or tube feeding) if they were to have a terminal illness. The authors combined responses into three categories ranging from the desire for more treatment to the desire for less treatment. After adjustment for other factors, 53% of women chose less treatment compared with 43% of men; 35% of blacks vs 15% of whites and 23% of the less well educated vs 15% of the better educated expressed the desire for more treatment. High depression scores also were associated with the desire for more treatment (26% for depressed vs 18% for others).
CONCLUSION: Patients' choices for care in the event of terminal illness relate to an intricate set of demographic, educational, and cultural factors. These results should not be used as a shortcut to determine patient preferences for care, but may provide new insights into the basis for patients' preferences. In discussing choices for future life-sustaining care, physicians need to explore with each individual the basis for his or her choices.
AD
Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599-7490.
PMID