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Medline ® Abstracts for References 34,36

of 'Advance care planning and advance directives'

34
TI
The influence of culture on end-of-life decision making.
AU
Bullock K
SO
J Soc Work End Life Palliat Care. 2011;7(1):83-98.
 
In their research, scholars have documented racial and ethnic differences in end-of-life care preferences, which have translated into cultural barriers. However, few studies have explained the racial differences. In the present study, focus groups with semi-structured follow-up interviews were utilized to elicit explanations for variance in decision making in a sample of Black and White community-dwelling residents. Participants identified specific cultural beliefs, values, and communication patterns that can be used to promote cultural competency among practitioners who provide care at end of life.
AD
Department of Social Work, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA. kbulloc@ncsu.edu
PMID
36
TI
Ethics and advance care planning in a culturally diverse society.
AU
Johnstone MJ, Kanitsaki O
SO
J Transcult Nurs. 2009;20(4):405.
 
Emerging international research suggests that in multicultural countries, such as Australia and the United States, there are significant disparities in end-of-life care planning and decision making by people of minority ethnic backgrounds compared with members of mainstream English-speaking background populations. Despite a growing interest in the profound influence of culture and ethnicity on patient choices in end-of-life care, and the limited uptake of advance care plans and advance directives by ethnic minority groups in mainstream health care contexts, there has been curiously little attention given to cross-cultural considerations in advance care planning and end-of-life care. Also overlooked are the possible implications of cross-cultural considerations for nurses, policy makers, and others at the forefront of planning and providing end-of-life care to people of diverse cultural and language backgrounds. An important aim of this article is to redress this oversight.
AD
Deakin University
PMID