UpToDate
Official reprint from UpToDate®
www.uptodate.com ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All Rights Reserved.

Medline ® Abstract for Reference 106

of 'Adjuvant chemotherapy for resected stage II colon cancer'

106
TI
Role of hMLH1 promoter hypermethylation in drug resistance to 5-fluorouracil in colorectal cancer cell lines.
AU
Arnold CN, Goel A, Boland CR
SO
Int J Cancer. 2003;106(1):66.
 
Loss of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) occurs in 10-15% of sporadic colorectal cancer, is usually caused by hMLH1 hypermethylation, and has been shown to confer resistance to various chemotherapeutic reagents, including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We tested the hypothesis that demethylation of the hMLH1 promoter in hypermethylated colorectal cancer cells would restore MMR proficiency and drug sensitivity to 5-FU. We used the MMR-deficient cell lines SW48, HCT116, HCT116+chr2 and the -proficient cell line HCT116+chr3. After treatment with the demethylating agent 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5 aza-dC), hMLH1 mRNA and protein expression were determined by RT-PCR and immunoblots. The methylation status for hMLH1 was investigated by methylation-specific PCR. Cells were subsequently treated with 5-FU and the growth characteristics ascertained by clonogenic assays. hMLH1 hypermethylation was reverted in SW48 cells 24 hr after treatment with 5 aza-dC and was accompanied by hMLH1 mRNA and protein reexpression. While 5 aza-dC alone did not affect the growth of SW48 cells, all other cell lines responded with a pronounced growth inhibition. 5-FU treatment strongly reduced the colony formation of HCT116+chr3 cells. These effects were significantly less in the MMR-deficient cells. Combined treatment of SW48 cells resulted in a similar growth pattern as seen in 5-FU only treated HCT116+chr3 cells. We demonstrate that in vitro resistance to 5-FU can be overcome by reexpression of hMLH1 protein through 5 aza-dC-induced demethylation in hypermethylated cell lines. Induction of the expression of methylated tumor suppressor or MMR genes could have a significant impact on the development of future chemotherapy strategies.
AD
Department of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA.
PMID