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Acquired TTP: Management following recovery from an acute episode and during remission

Authors
James N George, MD
Adam Cuker, MD, MS
Section Editor
Lawrence LK Leung, MD
Deputy Editor
Jennifer S Tirnauer, MD

INTRODUCTION

Most patients (85 to 90 percent) with acquired autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) are treated effectively with plasma exchange (PEX), glucocorticoids, and, for many patients, rituximab. However, relapse following remission is an important concern. Therefore, all patients who have recovered from an episode of TTP require lifelong monitoring and rapid intervention at the first sign of a relapse, and some may benefit from prophylactic immunosuppressive treatment. Additionally, patients require continued surveillance for a variety of important long-term health problems related to TTP.

This topic review discusses our approach to the management of a patient who has recovered from an acute episode of acquired TTP, including routine monitoring, evaluation for symptoms of relapse, prophylaxis, and management of long-term morbidities.

Separate topic reviews discuss other aspects of care for patients with acquired, autoimmune TTP (ie, TTP due to an autoantibody against ADAMTS13):

Diagnosis – (See "Acquired TTP: Clinical manifestations and diagnosis".)

Treatment of an acute episode – (See "Acquired TTP: Initial treatment".)

                          
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Literature review current through: Nov 2017. | This topic last updated: Nov 07, 2017.
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