Medline ® Abstracts for References 2-6

of 'Acanthosis nigricans'

2
TI
Prevalence of Acanthosis Nigricans in an urban population in Sri Lanka and its utility to detect metabolic syndrome.
AU
Dassanayake AS, Kasturiratne A, Niriella MA, Kalubovila U, Rajindrajith S, de Silva AP, Kato N, Wickremasinghe AR, de Silva HJ
SO
BMC Res Notes. 2011;4:25.
 
BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance (IR) plays a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Acanthosis nigricans (AN) is an easily detectable skin condition that is strongly associated with IR. The aims of this study were, firstly, to investigate the prevalence of AN among adults in an urban Sri Lankan community and secondly, to describe its utility to detect metabolic syndrome.
FINDINGS: In a community based investigation, 35-64 year adults who were selected using stratified random sampling, underwent interview, clinical examination, liver ultrasound scanning, and biochemical and serological tests. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed on revised ATP III criteria for Asian populations. AN was identified by the presence of dark, thick, velvety skin in the neck.2957 subjects were included in this analysis. The prevalence of AN, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus were 17.4%, 34.8% and 19.6%, respectively. There was a strong association between AN and metabolic syndrome. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of AN to detect metabolic syndrome were 28.2%, 89.0%, 45.9% and 79.0% for males, and 29.2%, 88.4%, 65.6% and 62.3% for females, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS: AN was common in our study population, and although it did not have a high enough sensitivity to be utilized as a screening test for metabolic syndrome, the presence of AN strongly predicts metabolic syndrome.
AD
Faculty of Medicine, University of Keleniya, Ragama, Sri Lanka. hjdes@sltnet.lk.
PMID
3
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Prevalence of acanthosis nigricans in relation to anthropometric measures: community-based cross-sectional study in Korean pre-adolescent school children.
AU
Chang Y, Woo HY, Sung E, Kim CH, Kang H, Ju YS, Park KH
SO
Pediatr Int. 2008;50(5):667.
 
BACKGROUND: This cross-sectional study was performed to assess the prevalence of acanthosis nigricans (AN) across various anthropometric measures and to identify the cut-offs for anthropometric indices of adiposity for development of AN in Asian preadolescent school children.
METHODS: Body mass index (BMI), percentage weight for height (PWH), percentage body fat (PBF), and AN of the neck were evaluated in children in the fifth grade of all elementary schools in one metropolitan, Korean city (2117 boys and 1916 girls, mean age 10.9 +/- 0.6 years, mean BMI 18.6 +/- 3.3 kg/m(2)).
RESULTS: The prevalence of AN was 8.4% in boys and 5.1% in girls, and was proportional to the BMI, PWH, and PBF. The prevalence of AN rose steeply in the 80th and 90th percentiles of the BMI, PWH, and PBF in boys and girls, respectively. According to receiver operating characteristic analysis, AN was observed in boys with BMI>22.2 kg/m(2), and in girls with BMI>21.2 kg/m(2), which are below the current criteria for childhood obesity (local BMI 95th percentile and International Obesity Task Force BMI 30 kg/m(2)).
CONCLUSIONS: AN has a good correlation with level of adiposity, and was already present in overweight children that were not considered obese by definition.
AD
Health Screening Center, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, SungKyunKwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
PMID
4
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Prevalence of acanthosis nigricans and its correlates in a cross-section of Nigerians with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
AU
Ogbera AO, Akinlade A, Ajose O, Awobusuyi J
SO
Trop Doct. 2009 Oct;39(4):235-6.
 
Acanthosis nigricans (AN) is a dermatological condition that is often associated with obesity and may be a physical marker of insulin resistance. Studies have documented a high prevalence rate of AN in people with diabetes mellitus (DM). However, there have been no Nigerian reports on AN and DM. This report bridges the information gap and documents the prevalence of AN in Nigerians with type 2 DM as well as its clinical correlates. Three hundred and forty consecutive subjects with type 2 DM were examined for the presence of AN and its associated clinical features. The prevalence of AN in type 2 DM in this report is 17%. Factors associated with AN include obesity, a family history of DM, female gender, the presence of hypertension and poor glycaemic control.
AD
Department of Medicine, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Nigeria. oogbera@yahoo.co.uk
PMID
5
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Screening obese students for acanthosis nigricans and other diabetes risk factors in the urban school-based health center.
AU
Rafalson L, Eysaman J, Quattrin T
SO
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2011 Aug;50(8):747-52.
 
OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of acanthosis nigricans (AN) and other diabetes risk factors in urban school health clinics.
METHODS: During the period 2006-2009 nurse practitioners (NPs) screened students who had a BMI≥95th percentile and 1 additional diabetes risk factor. Blood glucose (BG) was measured by finger stick. NPs were trained on how to ascertain the presence of AN on the neck area.
RESULTS: NPs screened 854 students (mean age 11.4 years, 60.5% female, and 73.3% black). AN and elevated BG were found among 26% and 6.4% of students, respectively. Females and minorities were respectively 50% and 4 times more likely to have AN. Youth with AN were twice as likely to have elevated glucose.
CONCLUSION: AN can be easily identified by trained health care professionals even in busy school-based clinic settings. Checking for AN and appropriate education and counseling should become a routine part of electronic documentation in overweight youth.
AD
State University of New York, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA. rafalson@dyc.edu
PMID
6
TI
Prevalence of acanthosis nigricans in newly-diagnosed type 2 diabetes.
AU
Litonjua P, Piñero-Piloña A, Aviles-Santa L, Raskin P
SO
Endocr Pract. 2004;10(2):101.
 
OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of acanthosis nigricans in a population of patients with newly-diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus.
METHODS: Chart review of men and women treated for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes at the University Diabetes Treatment Center at Parkland Health and Hospital System in Dallas, Texas between January 1998 and December 1999. The presence of acanthosis nigricans was evaluated on the posterior neck of each individual.
RESULTS: Of 216 patients identified with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, 78 individuals (36.1%) presented with acanthosis nigricans involving the back of the neck. Most subjects were obese, with the mean BMI of the subject population at 32.7 +/- 5.8 kg/m2 (mean +/- SD). Prevalence of acanthosis nigricans increased with degree of obesity, with fully 54.1% of the population with a BMI of>or = 30 kg/m2 manifesting the skin lesion. The prevalence of acanthosis nigricans differed notably among ethnic groups, as the lesion occurred in 50 (52.6%) of 95 African-American subjects and 28 (35.9%) of 78 Latin-American subjects. Patients with acanthosis nigricans required markedly higher insulin doses (82.3 +/- 7.2 units/day) to achieve euglycemia compared to those without the disorder (50.2 +/- 5.7 units/day).
CONCLUSION: These results suggest that acanthosis nigricans is a readily visible marker of hyperinsulinemia and is frequently encountered in patients with type 2 diabetes. Prevalence of acanthosis nigricans is influenced by ethnicity and BMI in this patient population.
AD
University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Department of Internal Medicine, Dallas, 75390, USA.
PMID